William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''O, he sits high in all the people's hearts;
    And that which would appear offence in us
    His countenance, like richest alchemy,
    Will change to virtue and to worthiness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Casca, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 157-60. Describing Brutus; "countenance" means appearance, and support; the aim of alchemy was to transmute base metals into gold.
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  • ''Honor's thought
    Reigns solely in the breast of every man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 2, prologue, l. 3-4. On the thought of doing great deeds and winning fame in battle.
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  • ''If she first meet the curled Antony,
    He'll make demand of her, and spend that kiss
    Which is my heaven to have.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 301-2. Referring to her servant Iras, who has just died; Cleopatra expects to meet Antony in death.
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  • ''My heart's subdued
    Even to the very quality of my lord.
    I saw Othello's visage in his mind,
    And to his honors and his valiant parts
    Did I my soul and fortunes consecrate.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Desdemona, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 250-4. Rejecting her father's assumption that she could not love a black man.
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  • ''I shall not want false witness to condemn me,
    Nor store of treasons to augment my guilt.
    The ancient proverb will be well effected:
    "A staff is quickly found to beat a dog."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke of Gloucester, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 168-71. On being accused of treason.
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  • ''Tut, tut, good enough to toss, food for powder, food for
    powder; they'll fill a pit as well as better. Tush, man,
    mortal men, mortal men.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 2, l. 65-7. Describing his conscripts.
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  • ''The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill
    together.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. First Lord, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 4, sc. 3, l. 71-2.
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  • ''The seasons change their manners, as the year
    Had found some months asleep and leapt them over.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 4, l. 123-4. "As" means as if; on unseasonable and strange weather.
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  • ''Speak the speech ... trippingly on the tongue; but if you mouth it ... I had as lief the town crier had spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently; for in the very torrent, tempest, and as I may say the whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 1-8 (1604). Instructing the players how to deliver the speech he has written for insertion in the play to be performed before Claudius and Gertrude.
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  • ''My friends were poor, but honest, so's my love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 3, l. 195. On her love for Bertram, nobly born; "friends" here means relations.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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