William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''O, he sits high in all the people's hearts;
    And that which would appear offence in us
    His countenance, like richest alchemy,
    Will change to virtue and to worthiness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Casca, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 157-60. Describing Brutus; "countenance" means appearance, and support; the aim of alchemy was to transmute base metals into gold.
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  • ''Honor's thought
    Reigns solely in the breast of every man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Chorus, in Henry V, act 2, prologue, l. 3-4. On the thought of doing great deeds and winning fame in battle.
  • ''If she first meet the curled Antony,
    He'll make demand of her, and spend that kiss
    Which is my heaven to have.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 301-2. Referring to her servant Iras, who has just died; Cleopatra expects to meet Antony in death.
  • ''My heart's subdued
    Even to the very quality of my lord.
    I saw Othello's visage in his mind,
    And to his honors and his valiant parts
    Did I my soul and fortunes consecrate.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Desdemona, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 250-4. Rejecting her father's assumption that she could not love a black man.
  • ''I shall not want false witness to condemn me,
    Nor store of treasons to augment my guilt.
    The ancient proverb will be well effected:
    "A staff is quickly found to beat a dog."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke of Gloucester, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 168-71. On being accused of treason.
  • ''Tut, tut, good enough to toss, food for powder, food for
    powder; they'll fill a pit as well as better. Tush, man,
    mortal men, mortal men.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 2, l. 65-7. Describing his conscripts.
  • ''The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill
    together.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. First Lord, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 4, sc. 3, l. 71-2.
  • ''The seasons change their manners, as the year
    Had found some months asleep and leapt them over.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 4, l. 123-4. "As" means as if; on unseasonable and strange weather.
  • ''Speak the speech ... trippingly on the tongue; but if you mouth it ... I had as lief the town crier had spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently; for in the very torrent, tempest, and as I may say the whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 1-8 (1604). Instructing the players how to deliver the speech he has written for insertion in the play to be performed before Claudius and Gertrude.
  • ''My friends were poor, but honest, so's my love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 3, l. 195. On her love for Bertram, nobly born; "friends" here means relations.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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