William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''First Plebian. Tear him to pieces, he's a conspirator!
    Cinna. I am Cinna the poet! I am Cinna the poet!
    Fourth Plebian. Tear him for his bad verses, tear him for his bad verses.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. First Plebian, Cinna the Poet and Fourth Plebian, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 3, l. 28-31. The angry plebeians are indiscriminate in their violence.
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  • ''Mine eyes are full of tears, my heart of grief.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 2, sc. 3, l. 17. On the banishment of his wife.
  • ''Well said, old mole, canst work i' th' earth so fast?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 5, l. 162. To the ghost, who seems to be moving about under the stage as it calls on Hamlet's friends to swear secrecy.
  • ''Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
    Which we ascribe to heaven.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 1.
  • ''I could brain him with his lady's fan.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 3, l. 23. Exasperated by the writer of a letter criticizing a plot, which Hotspur is involved in, against the king.
  • ''Jaques. I was seeking for a fool when I found you.
    Orlando. He is drowned in the brook; look but in, and you
    shall see him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques and Orlando, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 285-8. The lover Orlando wittily puts down the melancholy Jaques.
  • ''Thy youngest daughter does not love thee least,
    Nor are those empty-hearted whose low sounds
    Reverb no hollowness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Kent, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 152-4. Proverbial ("the emptiest vessel makes the greatest sound").
  • ''Thus hulling in
    The wild sea of my conscience, I did steer
    Toward this remedy, whereupon we are
    Now present here together.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VIII, act 2, sc. 4, l. 201. "Hulling" = drifting about; offering reasons for divorcing Katherine.
  • ''Within the hollow crown
    That rounds the mortal temples of a king
    Keeps Death his court, and there the antic sits,
    Scoffing his state and mocking at his pomp,
    Allowing him a breath, a little scene,
    To monarchize, be feared, and kill with looks.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 160-2. Death was often personified as a grinning skeleton, as in the common images of the Dance of Death; "antic" means grotesque clown.
  • ''Women's weapons, water-drops.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 2, l. 451 (1623). Lear, "as full of grief as age," responds to the treachery of the "unnatural hags" (his daughters, Goneril and Regan): "let not women's weapons, water-drops,/Stain my man's cheeks."

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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