William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Soothsayer. Beware the Ides of March.
    Caesar. He is a dreamer. Let us leave him. Pass.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Soothsayer and Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 2, l. 23-4. Caesar was in fact assassinated on March 15 (the Ides).
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  • ''Timon will to the woods, where he shall find
    Th' unkindest beast more kinder than mankind.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Timon, in Timon of Athens, act 4, sc. 1, l. 35-6. The beginning of his misanthropy.
  • ''Ambition (The soldier's virtue).''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Ventidius, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 3, sc. 1, l. 22-3.
  • ''Thou, old Adam's likeness, set to dress this garden.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 4, l. 73. Speaking to the gardener as if he were the first gardener, Adam.
  • '''Tis one thing to be tempted, Escalus,
    Another thing to fall.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angelo, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 1, l. 17-8. To Escalus, who has been pleading for Claudio, sentenced to death by Angelo for getting Juliet with child.
  • ''Cry "havoc!" and let loose the dogs of war,
    That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
    With carrion men, groaning for burial.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1.
  • ''Life itself, my wife, and all the world,
    Are not with me esteemed above thy life.
    I would lose all, ay, sacrifice them all
    Here to this devil, to deliver you.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 4, sc. 1, l. 284-7. To his friend Antonio; the devil is Shylock, demanding his pound of flesh.
  • ''Wise men ne'er sit and wail their woes,
    But presently prevent the ways to wail.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bishop of Carlisle, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 178-9. Giving the downcast Richard some good advice.
  • ''Let's kill him boldly, but not wrathfully;
    Let's carve him as a dish fit for the gods,
    Not hew him as a carcase fit for hounds.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 172-4. On the idea of killing Caesar.
  • ''It is the part of men to fear and tremble
    When the most mighty gods by tokens send
    Such dreadful heralds to astonish us.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Casca, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 54-6. On the ominous storms the night before Caesar is assassinated.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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