William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Caesar's spirit, ranging for revenge,
    With Ate by his side, come hot from hell,
    Shall in these confines, with a monarch's voice,
    Cry "Havoc!" and let slip the dogs of war.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 270-3. Ate was the Greek goddess of discord and destruction; the cry "Havoc!" Was the signal to kill and pillage without mercy.
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  • ''Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff; you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 1, l. 115-8.
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  • ''In the very May-morn of his youth,
    Ripe for exploits and mighty enterprises.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bishop of Ely, in Henry V, act 1, sc. 2, l. 120. On the newly crowned Henry V...
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  • ''When love begins to sicken and decay
    It useth an enforcèd ceremony.
    There are no tricks in plain and simple faith.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 2, l. 20-2. To Lucilius, who reports that Cassius appears unfriendly.
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  • ''Cassio. The divine Desdemona.
    Montano. What is she?
    Cassio. She that I spake of, our great captain's captain.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassio and Montano, in Othello, act 2, sc. 1, l. 73-4. Implying that Desdemona now commands Othello.
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  • ''Men may construe things after their fashion,
    Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cicero, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 34-5. "Construe" means interpret.
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  • ''His face was as the heav'ns, and therein stuck
    A sun and moon, which kept their course, and lighted
    The little O, th' earth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 5, sc. 2, l. 79-81. The dead Antony becomes godlike in her imaginative recall.
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  • ''Unkindness may do much,
    And his unkindness may defeat my life,
    But never taint my love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Desdemona, in Othello, act 4, sc. 2, l. 159-61. On Othello's harsh treatment of her; "defeat" means destroy.
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  • ''Comfort's in heaven, and we are on the earth,
    Where nothing lives but crosses, cares, and grief.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke of York, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 2, l. 78-9. He is left alone to try to deal with rebellion.
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  • ''Rebellion lay in his way, and he found it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 5, sc. 1, l. 28. On the Earl of Worcester, who says he did not seek rebellion.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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