William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Hence! Home, you idle creatures, get you home!
    Is this a holiday?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Flavius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 1, l. 1-2. One of the tribunes orders people who have come to see Caesar to get off the streets.
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  • ''These days are dangerous;
    Virtue is choked with foul ambition,
    And charity chased hence by rancor's hand.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 143-4. On plots against the King.
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  • ''The time is out of joint—O cursed spite,
    That ever I was born to set it right!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 5, l. 188-9. Lamenting not only the disorder of the time, but his own nativity.
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  • ''Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
    Which we ascribe to heaven.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 1, l. 212-3 (1623).
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  • ''Diseased nature oftentimes breaks forth
    In strange eruptions; oft the teeming earth
    Is with a kind of colic pinched and vexed
    By the imprisoning of unruly wind
    Within her womb, which, for enlargement striving,
    Shakes the old beldame earth, and topples down
    Steeples and moss-grown towers.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 26-32. Rejecting Glendower's claim that extraordinary events in nature at his birth were signs that he was to be remarkable; "beldame" means grandmother.
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  • ''Jaques. Why, 'tis good to be sad and say nothing.
    Rosalind. Why then 'tis good to be a post.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques and Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 8-9. In fact, Jaques cannot stop talking.
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  • ''Now have I done a good day's work.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Edward, in Richard III, act 2, sc. 1, l. 1. Thinking he has reconciled his quarrelling nobles.
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  • ''The gentleman is learned, and a most rare speaker.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VIII, act 1, sc. 2, l. 111. On Buckingham, arrested as a traitor.
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  • ''Yet I well remember
    The favors of these men. Were they not mine?
    Did they not sometimes cry "All hail!" to me?
    So Judas did to Christ; but He, in twelve,
    Found truth in all but one; I, in twelve thousand, none.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 4, sc. 1, l. 167-71. appearing, in effect, as Henry's prisoner; "favors" means looks as well as support. Judas Iscariot betrayed Christ; see Matthew 26:25.
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  • ''The bow is bent and drawn; make from the shaft.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 143. Threatening Kent.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain