William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''When daisies pied and violets blue,
    And lady-smocks, all silver-white,
    And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue
    Do paint the meadows with delight,
    The cuckoo then on every tree
    Mocks married men, for thus sings he:
    Cuckoo!
    Cuckoo, cuckoo—O word of fear,
    Unpleasing to a married ear.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Spring, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 5, sc. 2, l. 894-902. The first stanza of the song of Spring at the end of the play; the cuckoo's habit of using the nests of other birds suggests cuckoldry, and the refrain conflicts with the delights of spring.
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  • ''What need we have any friends, if we should ne'er have need of 'em? They were the most needless creatures living, if we should ne'er have use for 'em.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Timon, in Timon of Athens, act 1, sc. 2, l. 95-8. Believing his friends will help him if need be.
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  • ''I saw young Harry with his beaver on,
    His cuisses on his thighs, gallantly armed,
    Rise from the ground like feathered Mercury,
    And vaulted with such ease into his seat
    As if an angel dropped down from the clouds
    To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus,
    And witch the world with noble horsemanship.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Vernon, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 1, l. 104-10. Prince Hal, ready to fight against the rebels; "beaver" means helmet; "cuisses" means thigh armor; Mercury was the messenger of the gods, who had winged heels; "wind" means wheel round; "Pegasus" means mythical flying horse.
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  • ''Poor fellow never joyed since the price of oats rose, it was
    the death of him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 1st Carrier, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 1, l. 12-3. Remembering Robin, the ostler.
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  • ''Ever till now,
    When men were fond, I smiled and wondered how.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angelo, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 2, l. 185-6. Admitting he is sexually attracted to Isabella; "fond" means infatuated and foolish.
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  • ''Friends am I with you all, and love you all.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 220. To Cassius and the conspirators who killed Caesar.
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  • ''So may the outward shows be least themselves—
    The world is still deceived with ornament.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 73-4. Thinking about his choice of caskets; outward appearance may conceal inner reality.
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  • ''The strawberry grows underneath the nettle,
    And wholesome berries thrive and ripen best
    Neighbored by fruit of baser quality.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bishop of Ely, in Henry V, act 1, sc. 1, l. 60-2. Prince Hal was the strawberry growing under the shade of base companions like Falstaff.
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  • ''Whether we shall meet again I know not.
    Therefore our everlasting farewell take.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 5, sc. 1, l. 114-5. Saying farewell to Cassius.
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  • ''Hail to thee, lady! and the grace of heaven,
    Before, behind thee, and on every hand,
    Enwheel thee round!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassio, in Othello, act 2, sc. 1, l. 85-7. On Desdemona's arrival in Cyprus.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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