William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead!
    Run hence, proclaim, cry it about the streets!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cinna, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 78-9.
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  • ''None but Antony
    Should conquer Antony.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 15, l. 16-17. For her suicide shows the courage to remain in control of oneself.
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  • ''The heavens forbid
    But that our loves and comforts should increase
    Even as our days do grow!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Desdemona, in Othello, act 2, sc. 1, l. 193-5.
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  • ''Things past redress are now with me past care.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke of York, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 3, l. 171. Rephrasing the proverb, "past cure, past care."
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  • ''There's not a shirt and a half in all my company, and the half
    shirt is two napkins tacked together and thrown over the
    shoulders like a herald's coat without sleeves.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 2, l. 42-5. Describing the men he has conscripted to fight the rebels.
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  • ''O, the fierce wretchedness that glory brings us!
    Who would not wish to be from wealth exempt,
    Since riches point to misery and contempt?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Flavius, in Timon of Athens, act 4, sc. 2, l. 30-2. Commenting on the fall of Timon, abandoned by his friends.
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  • ''We have seen the best of our time. Machinations, hollowness, treachery, and all ruinous disorders follow us disquietly to our graves.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 112-4.
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  • ''Let me not think on't; frailty, thy name is woman.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 146 (1604). In Hamlet's first soliloquy he voices his unhappiness at the haste with which his mother had remarried when she had seemed so devoted to his father and had mourned him "Like Niobe, all tears."
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  • ''There is no living, none,
    If Bertram be away. 'Twere all one
    That I should love a bright particular star
    And think to wed it, he is so above me.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 1, l. 84-5. Expressing her unrequited adoration for a social superior ("'Twere all one That" means it is as if).
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  • ''Come, wilt thou see me ride?
    And when I am a'horseback, I will swear
    I love thee infinitely.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 3, l. 100-2. Joking that he will love his wife only when he leaves her.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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