William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Two lads that thought there was no more behind
    But such a day tomorrow as today,
    And to be boy eternal.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Polixenes, in The Winter's Tale, act 1, sc. 2, l. 63-5. Recalling his boyhood with Leontes.
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  • ''I will redeem all this on Percy's head,
    And in the closing of some glorious day,
    Be bold to tell you that I am your son.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 138-41. To his father, boasting that he will defeat the renowned Hotspur.
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  • ''Sir, I desire you do me right and justice,
    And to bestow your pity on me; for
    I am a most poor woman, and a stranger,
    Born out of your dominions.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen Katherine, in Henry VIII, act 2, sc. 4, l. 13-16. At the divorce proceedings, she appeals to her husband, Henry VIII.
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  • ''Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 1, sc. 1, l. 186. Meaning his unrequited love for Rosaline.
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  • ''Thou torturest me, Tubal. It was my turquoise; I had it of Leah when I was a bachelor. I would not have given it for a wilderness of monkeys.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 1, l. 120-3. On hearing that his daughter Jessica has traded his jewel for a monkey; he refers to his dead wife, Leah.
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  • ''Exit, pursued by a bear.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Stage direction, in The Winter's Tale, act 3, sc. 3, l. 57 (1623). This most famous of all stage directions, referring to the sudden exit of Antigonus, has led some critics to ask whether the bear was real, introduced as a theatrical coup. Most stage directions in Shakespeare's plays were additions by later editors.
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  • ''Gold? Yellow, glittering, precious gold?
    ...
    This yellow slave
    Will knit and break religions, bless th' accursed,
    Make the hoar leprosy adored, place thieves,
    And give them title, knee and approbation
    With senators on the bench.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Timon, in Timon of Athens, act 4, sc. 3, l. 26, 34-8. digging for roots to eat, Timon finds buried gold; "place" = place in office. The idea of a leper as white (hoary) may be derived from 1 Kings 5:27, "a leper white as snow."
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  • ''Wanton as youthful goats, wild as young bulls.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Vernon, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 1, l. 103. Prince Hal and his companions, ready for war against the rebels "wanton" means merry, frolicsome.
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  • ''I know a trick worth two of that.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 1st Carrier, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 1, l. 36-7. Varying a proverb; meaning I'm too clever to be taken in by your trick.
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  • ''The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angelo, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 2, l. 90. Reminding Isabella that the laws have existed even though they have not been enforced for some time.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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