William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''No care, no stop; so senseless of expense
    That he will neither know how to maintain it
    Nor cease his flow of riot, takes no account
    How things go from him, nor resumes no care
    Of what is to continue.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Flavius, in Timon of Athens, act 2, sc. 2, l. 1-5. On Timon's reckless spending on feasting his friends.
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  • ''O madam, my old heart is cracked, it's cracked!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 1, l. 90.
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  • ''We'll teach you to drink deep ere you depart.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 175. To his friend, Horatio, visiting him in Denmark.
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  • ''The hind that would be mated by the lion
    Must die for love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 1, sc. 1, l. 85-7. On the unbridgeable gulf between herself (hind means deer) and Count Bertram.
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  • ''Out of this nettle danger we pluck this flower safety.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hotspur, in Henry IV, pt. 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 9-10 (1598).
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  • '''Tis but an hour ago since it was nine,
    And after one hour more 'twill be eleven,
    And so from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe,
    And then from hour to hour, we rot and rot;
    And thereby hangs a tale.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 7, l. 24-8. Quoting Touchstone's basic view of life.
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  • ''Thus did I keep my person fresh and new,
    My presence, like a robe pontifical,
    Ne'er seen but wondered at, and so my state,
    Seldom but sumptuous, showed like a feast.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 55-8. Recalling his former renown when he was able to appear more important than Richard II, king at the time; "state" means greatness, pomp.
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  • ''She's noble born,
    And like her true nobility she has
    Carried herself towards me.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VIII, act 2, sc. 4, l. 142-4. Praising Katherine the wife he is about to divorce.
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  • ''I'll give my jewels for a set of beads,
    My gorgeous palace for a hermitage,
    ...
    And my large kingdom for a little grave,
    A little, little grave, an obscure grave.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 3, l. 147-8, 153-4. Already yielding in mind to his inevitable deposition from the throne.
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  • ''O, let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven!
    Keep me in temper. I would not be mad.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 5.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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