William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 1, l. 36-8 (1623). Of the murdered Duncan.
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  • ''Come not between the dragon and his wrath.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 122.
  • ''Had I but died an hour before this chance
    I had lived a blessed time; for from this instant
    There's nothing serious in mortality.
    All is but toys. Renown and grace is dead;
    The wine of life is drawn, and the mere lees
    Is left this vault to brag of.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Macbeth (II, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Not yet old enough for a man, nor young enough for a boy; as a squash is before 'tis a peascod, or a codling when 'tis almost an apple. 'Tis with him in standing water between boy and man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Malvolio, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 5, l. 156-9. Describing Cesario, Orsino's page (the disguised Viola); a squash was an unripe peapod; and a codling an unripe apple.
  • ''We may outrun
    By violent swiftness that which we run at,
    And lose by over-running.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Norfolk, in Henry VIII, act 1, sc. 1, l. 141-3. Varying the proverb, "make haste slowly" (Latin "festina lente").
  • ''O, when mine eyes did see Olivia first,
    Methought she purged the air of pestilence;
    That instant was I turned into a hart,
    And my desires, like fell and cruel hounds,
    E'er since pursue me.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orsino, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 1, l. 18-22. The image of Actaeon, transformed into a stag by Diana, lies behind these lines.
  • ''Being fooled, by foolery thrive;
    There's place and means for every man alive.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Parolles, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 4, sc. 3, l. 339. Shown up as a fool, he hopes to live by fooling others.
  • ''Epicurean cooks
    Sharpen with cloyless sauce his appetite.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pompey, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 2, sc. 1, l. 24-5. Imagining Antony's luxurious idling in Egypt.
  • ''O monstrous! but one half-penny-worth of bread to this
    intolerable deal of sack!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 540-1. Reading the tavern bill found in Falstaff's pocket.
  • ''That island of England breeds very valiant creatures; their
    mastiffs are of unmatchable courage.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rambures, in Henry V, act 3, sc. 7, l. 140-2.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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