William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''She's beautiful, and therefore to be wooed;
    She is a woman, therefore to be won.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Suffolk, in Henry VI, pt. 1, act 5, sc. 5. Demetrius voices a similar thought in Titus Andronicus, act 2, sc. 1: She is a woman, therefore may be wooed; She is a woman, therefore may be won; She is Lavinia, therefore must be loved.
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  • ''So doth the woodbine the sweet honeysuckle
    Gently entwist; the female ivy so
    Enrings the barky fingers of the elm.
    O how I love thee! How I dote on thee!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titania, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 4, sc. 1, l. 42-4. "Woodbine" is convolvulus (morning glory).
  • ''Viola. What country, friends, is this?
    Sea Captain. This is Illyria, lady.
    Viola. And what should I do in Illyria?
    My brother he is in Elysium.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Viola and Sea Captain, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 2, l. 1-4. Viola thinks her brother is dead and in heaven; "Elysium" parallels "Illyria," an area in the Balkans adjacent to the Adriatic Sea.
  • ''Weaving spiders, come not here;
    Hence, you longlegged spinners, hence!
    Beetles black approach not near;
    Worm nor snail, do no offence.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 1st Fairy, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 2, l. 20-3. A charm to protect the sleeping Titania from tiny creatures common in England, and all harmless, though once thought to be venomous.
  • ''What's this, what's this? Is it her fault or mine?
    The tempter, or the tempted, who sins most, ha?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angelo, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 2, l. 162-3. Finding he is sexually attracted to the novice Isabella.
  • ''O mighty Caesar! Dost thou lie so low?
    Are all thy conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils,
    Shrunk to this little measure? Fare thee well.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 148-50. Seeing the dead body of Caesar.
  • ''Madam, you have bereft me of all words.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 175. Unable to express his joy as Portia gives him her ring.
  • ''A while to work, and after, holiday.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bolingbroke, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 1, l. 44. Seeing he needs only to defeat the Welsh to gain the kingdom.
  • ''Now sit we close about this taper here,
    And call in question our necessities.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 164-5. To Cassius, Titinius, and Messala; "call in question" means take stock of.
  • ''O God, that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains! That we should with joy, pleasance, revel, and applause transform ourselves into beasts!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassio, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain

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