William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I have neither the scholar's melancholy, which is emulation;
    nor the musician's, which is fantastical; nor the
    courtier's, which is proud; nor the soldier's, which is
    ambitious; nor the lawyer's, which is politic; nor the
    lady's, which is nice; nor the lover's, which is all these.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 4, sc. 1, l. 10-5. Claiming his brand of melancholy is unique to himself.
    0 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''I'll so offend to make offence a skill,
    Redeeming time when men least think I will.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 1, sc. 2, l. 216-7. Planning to make up for wasted time.
  • ''But your discretions better can persuade
    Than I am able to instruct or teach,
    And therefore, as we hither came in peace,
    So let us still continue peace and love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 4, sc. 1, l. 158-9. Henry is trying to preserve peace among the quarrelling factions in England.
  • ''Of comfort no man speak.
    Let's talk of graves, of worms and epitaphs,
    Make dust our paper, and with rainy eyes
    Write sorrow on the bosom of the earth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 144-7. In despair realizing all is lost.
  • ''Get thee glass eyes,
    And, like a scurvy politician, seem
    To see the things thou dost not.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 5.
  • ''I am a kind of burr; I shall stick.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lucio, in Measure for Measure, act 4, sc. 4, l. 179. Determined to stay with the Duke, who wants to shake him off.
  • ''Shake off this downy sleep, death's counterfeit,
    And look on death itself!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macduff, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 3, l. 76-7. On the death of Duncan; varying the proverb, "sleep is the image of death."
  • ''We'll leave a proof, by that which we will do,
    Wives may be merry, and yet honest too:''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mrs. Page, in The Merry Wives of Windsor, act 4, sc. 2, l. 104-5. Plotting to expose Falstaff and remain chaste.
  • ''What e'er you are
    That in this desert inaccessible,
    Under the shade of melancholy boughs,
    Lose and neglect the creeping hours of time.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orlando, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 7, l. 109-12. Meeting Duke Senior's company in the forest of Arden, he sees them as wasting time.
  • ''O thou weed!
    Who art so lovely fair and smell'st so sweet
    That the sense aches at thee, would thou hadst ne'er been born!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 4, sc. 2, l. 67-9. Thinking Desdemona is false to him.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

[Report Error]