William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''This is a slight unmeritable man,
    Meet to be sent on errands.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 1, l. 12-3. To Octavius, showing his contempt for the third member of the triumvirate, Lepidus.
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  • ''There is no vice so simple but assumes
    Some mark of virtue on his outward parts.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 81-2. "Simple" means plain or unadulterated.
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  • ''Then England's ground, farewell. Sweet soil, adieu,
    My mother and my nurse that bears me yet!
    Where e'er I wander, boast of this I can:
    Though banished, yet a true-born Englishman.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bolingbroke, in Richard II, act 1, sc. 3, l. 306-9. Spoken as he goes off to exile.
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  • ''I know no personal cause to spurn at him,
    But for the general: he would be crowned.
    How that might change his nature, there's the question.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 11-3. Thinking about the conspiracy against Caesar.
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  • ''He hath achieved a maid
    That paragons description and wild fame;
    One that excels the quirks of blazoning pens.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassio, in Othello, act 2, sc. 1, l. 61-3. The maid is Desdemona, who surpasses ("paragons") description, and goes beyond the witty conceptions ("quirks") of those who would proclaim her beauty ("blazon" is a term from heraldry, meaning originally a shield or badge).
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  • ''Methoughts a legion of foul fiends
    Environed me, and howled in mine ears
    Such hideous cries that with the very noise
    I trembling waked, and for a season after
    Could not believe but that I was in hell,
    Such terrible impression made my dream.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Clarence, in Richard III, act 1, sc. 4, l. 58-63. his fearful dream. Anticipating his own death.
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  • ''If you find him sad,
    Say I am dancing; if in mirth, report
    That I am sudden sick.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 3, l. 3-5. Teasing Antony by being contrary.
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  • ''For let our finger ache, and it endues
    Our other healthful members even to a sense
    Of pain.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Desdemona, in Othello, act 3, sc. 4, l. 146-8. "Endues" means brings.
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  • ''This wide and universal theatre
    Presents more woeful pageants than the scene
    Wherein we play in.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke Senior, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 7, l. 136-9. He has just heard from Orlando of Adam's sufferings from age and hunger.
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  • ''I am bewitched with the rogue's company. If the rascal have not given me medicines to make me love him, I'll be hanged. It could not be else, I have drunk medicines.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 2, l. 18-20. Speaking of Poins, who has taken his horse.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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