William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''We profess
    Ourselves to be the slaves of chance, and flies
    Of every wind that blows.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Florizel, in The Winter's Tale, act 4. Sc. 4, l. 539-41. Having no idea where to take Perdita.
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  • ''You ever gentle gods, take my breath from me;
    Let not my worser spirit tempt me again
    To die before you please!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 6, l. 217-9. Encountering the mad king, in worse condition than himself, has made him abandon thoughts of suicide.
  • ''Suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 17-8. Instructing the actors; "modesty" means moderation.
  • ''O that a lady, of one man refused,
    Should of another therefore be abused!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 2, l. 139-40. Helena finds herself scorned by both Lysander and Demetrius.
  • ''Wedding is great Juno's crown,
    O blessed bond of board and bed!
    'Tis Hymen peoples every town,
    High wedlock then be honorèd.
    Honor, high honor, and renown
    To Hymen, god of every town!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hymen, in As You Like It, act 5, sc. 4, l. 141-6. Hymen means god of marriage, and Juno, queen of the gods, also protected marriage.
  • ''I will through and through
    Cleanse the foul body of th' infected world,
    If they will patiently receive my medicine.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 7, l. 60-1. Claiming a godlike ability to purge people of their sins.
  • ''The hope and expectation of thy time
    Is ruined, and the soul of every man
    Prophetically do forethink thy fall.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 36. To Prince Henry, heir to the crown.
  • ''Civil dissension is a viperous worm
    That gnaws the bowels of the commonwealth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 72-3.
  • ''Cry woe, destruction, ruin, and decay:
    The worst is death, and death will have his day.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 102-3. Despairing at ever more bad news.
  • ''And thou, all-shaking thunder,
    Strike flat the thick rotundity o' the world!
    Crack nature's moulds, all germens spill at once
    That makes ingrateful man!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 2, l. 6-9. Jupiter spoke in thunder, which is the voice of God in the Book of Job, too. "Moulds" are the forms with which nature creates living beings; "germens" means seeds.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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