William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''We profess
    Ourselves to be the slaves of chance, and flies
    Of every wind that blows.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Florizel, in The Winter's Tale, act 4. Sc. 4, l. 539-41. Having no idea where to take Perdita.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''You ever gentle gods, take my breath from me;
    Let not my worser spirit tempt me again
    To die before you please!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 6, l. 217-9. Encountering the mad king, in worse condition than himself, has made him abandon thoughts of suicide.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 17-8. Instructing the actors; "modesty" means moderation.
    3 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''O that a lady, of one man refused,
    Should of another therefore be abused!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 2, l. 139-40. Helena finds herself scorned by both Lysander and Demetrius.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Wedding is great Juno's crown,
    O blessed bond of board and bed!
    'Tis Hymen peoples every town,
    High wedlock then be honorèd.
    Honor, high honor, and renown
    To Hymen, god of every town!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hymen, in As You Like It, act 5, sc. 4, l. 141-6. Hymen means god of marriage, and Juno, queen of the gods, also protected marriage.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''I will through and through
    Cleanse the foul body of th' infected world,
    If they will patiently receive my medicine.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 7, l. 60-1. Claiming a godlike ability to purge people of their sins.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''The hope and expectation of thy time
    Is ruined, and the soul of every man
    Prophetically do forethink thy fall.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 36. To Prince Henry, heir to the crown.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Civil dissension is a viperous worm
    That gnaws the bowels of the commonwealth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 3, sc. 1, l. 72-3.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Cry woe, destruction, ruin, and decay:
    The worst is death, and death will have his day.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 2, l. 102-3. Despairing at ever more bad news.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''And thou, all-shaking thunder,
    Strike flat the thick rotundity o' the world!
    Crack nature's moulds, all germens spill at once
    That makes ingrateful man!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 2, l. 6-9. Jupiter spoke in thunder, which is the voice of God in the Book of Job, too. "Moulds" are the forms with which nature creates living beings; "germens" means seeds.
    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

[Report Error]