William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''So doth the swan her downy cygnets save,
    Keeping them prisoner underneath her wings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Suffolk, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 5, sc. 3, l. 56-7. Showing his affection for Margaret of France, taken prisoner by the English, and placed in his care.
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  • ''Feed him with apricots and dewberries,
    With purple grapes, green figs, and mulberries.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titania, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 1, l. 166-7. Infatuated with Bottom, she tells her fairies to indulge him.
  • ''No man hath any quarrel to me. My remembrance is very free and clear from any image of offence done to any man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Viola, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 4, l. 226-8. Responding to Sir Toby's demand that she meet the challenge of Sir Andrew Aguecheek.
  • ''Our sea-walled garden, the whole land,
    Is full of weeds, her fairest flowers choked up,
    Her fruit-trees all unpruned, her hedges ruined,
    Her knots disordered, and her wholesome herbs
    Swarming with caterpillars.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 1st Gardener's Man, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 4, l. 43-7. Recalling the image of King Richard's favorites as "caterpillars of the commonwealth"; "knots" were patterned beds of flowers.
  • ''Your sense pursues not mine. Either you are ignorant,
    Or seem so, craftily; and that's not good.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angelo, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 4, l. 74-5. Isabella does not understand that Angelo wants her sexually, and he thinks she is devious, like himself.
  • ''You are not wood, you are not stones, but men;
    And being men, hearing the will of Caesar,
    It will inflame you, it will make you mad.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 142-4. Addressing the people.
  • ''Promise me life, and I'll confess the truth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 34. To Portia, who is anxious to be assured of his love.
  • ''Sweet peace conduct his sweet soul to the bosom
    Of good old Abraham!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bolingbroke, in Richard II, act 4, sc. 1, l. 103-4. On news of the death of his enemy Mowbray; "Abraham's bosom" means heaven; from Luke 16:22.
  • ''Must I give way and room to your rash choler?
    Shall I be frighted when a madman stares?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 39-40. Responding to the angry Cassius.
  • ''You may relish him more in the soldier than in the scholar.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassio, in Othello, act 2, sc. 1, l. 165-6. Cassio's account of Iago.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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