William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''So doth the swan her downy cygnets save,
    Keeping them prisoner underneath her wings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Suffolk, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 5, sc. 3, l. 56-7. Showing his affection for Margaret of France, taken prisoner by the English, and placed in his care.
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  • ''Feed him with apricots and dewberries,
    With purple grapes, green figs, and mulberries.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titania, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 1, l. 166-7. Infatuated with Bottom, she tells her fairies to indulge him.
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  • ''No man hath any quarrel to me. My remembrance is very free and clear from any image of offence done to any man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Viola, in Twelfth Night, act 3, sc. 4, l. 226-8. Responding to Sir Toby's demand that she meet the challenge of Sir Andrew Aguecheek.
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  • ''Our sea-walled garden, the whole land,
    Is full of weeds, her fairest flowers choked up,
    Her fruit-trees all unpruned, her hedges ruined,
    Her knots disordered, and her wholesome herbs
    Swarming with caterpillars.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 1st Gardener's Man, in Richard II, act 3, sc. 4, l. 43-7. Recalling the image of King Richard's favorites as "caterpillars of the commonwealth"; "knots" were patterned beds of flowers.
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  • ''Your sense pursues not mine. Either you are ignorant,
    Or seem so, craftily; and that's not good.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angelo, in Measure for Measure, act 2, sc. 4, l. 74-5. Isabella does not understand that Angelo wants her sexually, and he thinks she is devious, like himself.
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  • ''You are not wood, you are not stones, but men;
    And being men, hearing the will of Caesar,
    It will inflame you, it will make you mad.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 142-4. Addressing the people.
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  • ''Promise me life, and I'll confess the truth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 34. To Portia, who is anxious to be assured of his love.
    1 person liked.
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  • ''Sweet peace conduct his sweet soul to the bosom
    Of good old Abraham!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bolingbroke, in Richard II, act 4, sc. 1, l. 103-4. On news of the death of his enemy Mowbray; "Abraham's bosom" means heaven; from Luke 16:22.
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  • ''Must I give way and room to your rash choler?
    Shall I be frighted when a madman stares?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 39-40. Responding to the angry Cassius.
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  • ''You may relish him more in the soldier than in the scholar.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassio, in Othello, act 2, sc. 1, l. 165-6. Cassio's account of Iago.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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