William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Then the justice,
    In fair round belly with good capon lined,
    With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
    Full of wise saws and modern instances;
    And so he plays his part.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 7, l. 153-7. The fifth of the "seven ages" of man, when he is full of wise sayings and trite examples; the capon or cock may be a bribe.
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  • ''A fellow of no mark nor livelihood.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 40-1. On what he would have been had he behaved like Prince Hal; "livelihood" means means of living.
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  • ''I can express no kinder sign of love
    Than this kind kiss.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 1, sc. 1, l. 18-9. Welcoming his French queen to England.
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  • ''Thou art all ice. Thy kindness freezes.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard III, act 4, sc. 2.
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  • ''Nothing will come of nothing.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 90. Proverbial.
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  • ''A very superficial, ignorant, unweighing fellow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lucio, in Measure for Measure, act 3, sc. 2, l. 139-40. Abusing the Duke to a Friar (the Duke in disguise); "unweighing" means injudicious.
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  • ''To show an unfelt sorrow is an office
    Which the false man does easy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Malcolm, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 3, l. 136-7. "Easy" means easily.
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  • ''Heaven give you many, many merry days!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mrs. Page, in The Merry Wives of Windsor, act 5, sc. 5, l. 240. To Fenton on his marriage to Anne Page.
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  • ''I will chide no breather in the world but myself, against
    whom I know most faults.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orlando, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 280-1. Refusing to join Jaques in abusing the world.
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  • ''I had been happy, if the general camp,
    Pioneers and all, had tasted her sweet body,
    So I had nothing known.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Othello, in Othello, act 3, sc. 3, l. 350-2 (1623). On Desdemona's imagined infidelity.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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