William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''At your request
    My father will grant precious things as trifles.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Florizel, in The Winter's Tale, act 5, sc. 1, l. 221-2. To Perdita; "as" means as if they were.
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  • ''As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods,
    They kill us for their sport.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gloucester, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 1, l. 36-7. A cynical or despairing view; "wanton" means playful.
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  • ''Sure He that made us with such large discourse,
    Looking before and after, gave us not
    That capability and godlike reason
    To fust in us unused.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 4, sc. 4, l. 36-9. Reason is "godlike" as shared with the creator, and marking the difference between human beings and beasts.
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  • ''Therefore is love said to be a child
    Because in choice he is so oft beguiled.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Helena, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 1, sc. 1, l. 238-9. "Child" means both Cupid, and lover who are so often deluded ("beguiled") in the choice they make.
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  • ''I have't. It is engendered. Hell and night
    Must bring this monstrous birth to the world's light.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 1, sc. 3, l. 403-4. Exactly what evil Iago has in mind is not yet clear.
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  • ''Thy loving voyage
    Is but for two months victualled.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 5, sc. 4, l. 91-2. To Touchstone, about to marry Audrey.
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  • ''Our hands are full of business, let's away,
    Advantage feeds him fat while men delay.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 179-80. "Feeds him fat" means grows lazy, loses its edge.
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  • ''O Lord that lends me life,
    Lend me a heart replete with thankfulness!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 1, sc. 1, l. 19-20.
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  • ''My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
    And every tongue brings in a several tale,
    And every tale condemns me for a villain.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard III, act 5, sc. 5. Later, before the Battle of Bosworth, Richard rejects conscience with the words, "Conscience is but a word that cowards use, Devised at first to keep the strong in awe" (act 5, sc. 6).
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  • ''I am a man more sinned against than sinning.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 2, l. 59-60 (1623).
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;