William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I must have liberty
    Withal, as large a charter as the wind.
    To blow on whom, I please.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jaques, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 7, l. 47-8. He wants to be free to satirize everyone.
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  • ''The skipping King, he ambled up and down,
    With shallow jesters and rash bavin wits,
    Soon kindled and soon burnt, carded his state,
    Mingled his royalty with cap'ring fools.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 3, sc. 2, l. 60-3. Speaking to his son of Richard II; "bavin" means brushwood; "carded his state" means weakened his power.
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  • ''Let never day nor night unhallowed pass,
    But still remember what the Lord hath done.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 2, sc. 1, l. 83-4. To a blind man who recovered his sight; "unhallowed" means unblessed by prayers.
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  • ''My conscience hath a thousand several tongues,
    And every tongue brings in a several tale,
    And every tale condemns me for a villain.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Richard, in Richard III, act 5, sc. 5, l. 147 (1597). Later, before the Battle of Bosworth, Richard rejects conscience with the words— Conscience is but a word that cowards use, Devised at first to keep the strong in awe. (Act 5, sc. 6, l. 39-40).
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  • ''How dost, my boy? Art cold?
    I am cold myself. Where is this straw, good fellow?
    The art of our necessities is strange
    And can make vile things precious.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 3, sc. 2, l. 68-71. Out in the storm, he learns there is a hovel nearby; the "boy" is his Fool.
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  • ''This is no time to lend money, especially upon bare friendship without security.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lucullus, in Timon of Athens, act 3, sc. 1, l. 41-3. Refusing to help Timon.
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  • ''Receive what cheer you may;
    The night is long that never finds the day.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Malcolm, in Macbeth, act 4, sc. 3, l. 239-40.
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  • ''Sigh no more Ladies, sigh no more
    Men were deceivers ever,
    One foote in Sea, and one on shore,
    To one thing constant never,''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Much Ado about Nothing (II, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''If I be foiled, there is but one shamed that was never
    gracious; if killed, but one dead that is willing to be so.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orlando, in As You Like It, act 1, sc. 2, l. 187-9. Not caring whether he is overthrown ("foiled"), as he volunteers to wrestle with a deadly professional.
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  • ''Heaven give thee joy!
    What cannot be eschewed must be embraced.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Page, in The Merry Wives of Windsor, act 5, sc. 5, l. 236-7. Discovering that Fenton has married his daughter.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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