William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Now let it work! Mischief, thou art afoot,
    Take thou what course thou wilt.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 260-1. He has achieved his aim, as the people rush off to burn and destroy.
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  • ''Look on beauty,
    And you shall see 'tis purchased by the weight,
    Which therein works a miracle in nature,
    Making them lightest that wear most of it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bassanio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 2, l. 88-91. Referring to cosmetics as making the wearer "light" or lascivious.
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  • ''I count myself in nothing else so happy
    As in a soul remembering my good friends.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bolingbroke, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 3, l. 46-7.
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  • ''Censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 16-7. To the people; "censure" means judge.
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  • ''O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassio, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3, l. 281-3.
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  • ''Claudio. The old ornament of his cheek hath already stuffed tennis-balls.
    Leonato. Indeed, he looks younger than he did, by the loss of a beard.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio and Leonato, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 2, l. 46-9. Benedick appears clean-shaven for the sake of Beatrice, who said she could not stand a bearded man.
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  • ''Think on me,
    That am with Phoebus' amorous pinches black.
    And wrinkled deep in time?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cleopatra, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 5, l. 27-8. Acknowledging her age (she was 38) and experience in love; Phoebus was god of the sun.
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  • ''When you have our roses,
    You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves,
    And mock us with our bareness.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Diana, in All's Well That Ends Well, act 4, sc. 2, l. 18-20. Resisting Bertram's attempt to seduce her.
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  • ''And this our life, exempt from public haunt,
    Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks,
    Sermons in stones, and good in everything.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Duke Senior, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 1.
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  • ''I am as vigilant as a cat to steal cream.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 4, sc. 2, l. 58-9.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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