William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''A surfeit of the sweetest things
    The deepest loathing to the stomach brings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lysander, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 2, l. 137-8. Finding he now hates his earlier love, Hermia.
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  • ''Nothing in his life
    Became him like the leaving it. He died
    As one that had been studied in his death
    To throw away the dearest thing he owed
    As 'twere a careless trifle.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Malcolm, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 4, l. 7-11 (1623). Referring to Cawdor.
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  • ''Pardon, goddess of the night,
    Those that slew thy virgin knight,
    For the which, with songs of woe,
    Round about her tomb they go.
    Midnight, assist our moan;
    Help us to sigh and groan,
    Heavily, heavily.
    Graves, yawn and yield your dead,
    Till death be uttered,
    Heavily, heavily.
    Now unto thy bones good night!
    Yearly will I do this rite.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Much Ado about Nothing (V, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Run, run, Orlando, carve on every tree
    The fair, the chaste, and unexpressive she.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orlando, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 10. Unexpressive means inexpressible.
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  • ''Old, cold, withered, and of intolerable entrails.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Page, in The Merry Wives of Windsor, act 5, sc. 5, l. 153-4. Page's description of Falstaff and his great belly.
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  • ''The best actors in the world, either for tragedy, comedy, history, pastoral, pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral,
    tragical-historical, tragical-comical-historical-pastoral,
    scene individable, or poem unlimited.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Polonius, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 396-400. Listing every kind of play, and then some.
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  • ''Mark now how a plain tale shall put you down.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 254-5. Telling the true story to expose Falstaff's lies.
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  • ''Yet now farewell, and farewell life with thee!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen Margaret, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 3, sc. 2, l. 356. Bidding farewell to her banished lover.
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  • ''It was the lark, the herald of the morn,
    No nightingale. Look, love, what envious streaks
    Do lace the severing clouds in yonder east.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 3, sc. 5, l. 6-8. To Juliet; their wedding night has ended all too soon.
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  • ''How like a fawning publican he looks!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 3, l. 41. Referring to Antonio as if he were a tax collector for the ancient Romans; an allusion to Luke 18: 10-14, where the publican looks down humbly in contrast to the Pharisee, showing that "everyone that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted."
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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