William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Doubt thou the stars are fire,
    Doubt that the sun doth move,
    Doubt truth to be a liar,
    But never doubt I love.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Polonius, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 16-9. quoting from Hamlet's letter to Ophelia, who has given it to him; "doubt" means suspect. (According to the Ptolemaic idea of the universe, the sun moved round the earth.).
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  • ''As familiar with me as my dog.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 2, l. 106-7.
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  • ''I can give the loser leave to chide.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen Margaret, in Henry VI, Part 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 182. The loser is the Duke of Gloucester, arrested at her instigation.
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  • ''Death, that hath sucked the honey of thy breath,
    Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.
    Thou art not conquered. Beauty's ensign yet
    Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks,
    And death's pale flag is not advanced there.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 5, sc. 3, l. 92-6. He has opened the tomb where Juliet lies, thought to be dead, but really unconscious and still alive.
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  • ''There is some ill a-brewing towards my rest,
    For I did dream of money bags tonight.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 5, l. 17-8.
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  • ''When first this order was ordained, my lords,
    Knights of the Garter were of noble birth,
    Valiant and virtuous, full of haughty courage.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Talbot, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 4, sc. 1, l. 33-5. on the founding of the Order of the Garter, founded about 1344 by Edward III, who is said to have picked up the garter of a lady he was dancing with. It is a blue ribbon buckled with gold, worn on the left leg, and bears the inscription "Honi soit qui mal y pense," or cursed be he who thinks evil of this.
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  • ''This same progeny of evils comes
    From our debate, from our dissension.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titania, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 1, l. 115-6. On the disorder resulting from her quarrel ("debate") with Oberon.
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  • ''I will believe thou hast a mind that suits
    With this thy fair and outward character.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Viola, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 2, l. 50-1. To the captain of the ship that brought her to Illyria.
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  • ''The melancholy Jaques.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 1st Lord, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 1, l. 26. The adjective has permanently stuck to the character.
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  • ''Now does he feel his title
    Hang loose about him like a giant's robe
    Upon a dwarfish thief.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Angus, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 2, l. 20-2. As if Macbeth has become too small for his office as King of Scotland.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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