William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I mean that my heart unto yours is knit,
    So that but one heart we can make of it:
    Two bosoms interchainèd with an oath,
    So then two bosoms and a single troth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lysander, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 2, l. 47-50. A pretty idea of the union of lovers, but a bit premature for Hermia.
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  • ''Let us seek out some desolate shade, and there
    Weep our sad bosoms empty.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Malcolm, in Macbeth, act 4, sc. 3, l. 1-2.
  • ''My glass shall not persuade me I am old
    So long as youth and thou are of one date,
    But when in thee time's furrows I behold,
    Then look I death my days should expiate.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. My glass shall not persuade me I am old (l. 1-4). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orlando, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 398-9. Proverbial; he has been trying to express in rhymes how much he is in love.
  • ''What a pair of spectacles is here!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pandarus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 4, sc. 4, l. 14. Looking at Troilus and Cressida embracing, and quibbling on spectacles = eyeglasses.
  • ''Give thy thoughts no tongue,
    Nor any unproportioned thought his act.
    Be thou familiar but by no means vulgar.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Polonius, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 3, l. 59-61 (1604). Advice to his son Laertes, departing for France ("unproportioned" means "inappropriate").
  • ''Let the end try the man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 2, l. 47. Try means test, show the true worth of.
  • ''The day will come when thou shalt wish for me
    To help thee curse this poisonous bunch-backed toad.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen Margaret, in Richard III, act 1, sc. 3, l. 244-5. Foreshadowing the misery Richard (the "toad") will inflict on Edward's Queen, Elizabeth.
  • ''A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 4, l. 147-9. Describing his friend Mercutio to the nurse; "stand to" means defend.
  • ''Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 1, l. 59-64. His famous defence of the shared humanity of Jews.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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