William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I mean that my heart unto yours is knit,
    So that but one heart we can make of it:
    Two bosoms interchainèd with an oath,
    So then two bosoms and a single troth.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lysander, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 2, sc. 2, l. 47-50. A pretty idea of the union of lovers, but a bit premature for Hermia.
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  • ''Let us seek out some desolate shade, and there
    Weep our sad bosoms empty.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Malcolm, in Macbeth, act 4, sc. 3, l. 1-2.
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  • ''My glass shall not persuade me I am old
    So long as youth and thou are of one date,
    But when in thee time's furrows I behold,
    Then look I death my days should expiate.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. My glass shall not persuade me I am old (l. 1-4). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
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  • ''Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orlando, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 398-9. Proverbial; he has been trying to express in rhymes how much he is in love.
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  • ''What a pair of spectacles is here!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Pandarus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 4, sc. 4, l. 14. Looking at Troilus and Cressida embracing, and quibbling on spectacles = eyeglasses.
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  • ''Give thy thoughts no tongue,
    Nor any unproportioned thought his act.
    Be thou familiar but by no means vulgar.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Polonius, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 3, l. 59-61 (1604). Advice to his son Laertes, departing for France ("unproportioned" means "inappropriate").
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  • ''Let the end try the man.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Hal, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 2, l. 47. Try means test, show the true worth of.
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  • ''The day will come when thou shalt wish for me
    To help thee curse this poisonous bunch-backed toad.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Queen Margaret, in Richard III, act 1, sc. 3, l. 244-5. Foreshadowing the misery Richard (the "toad") will inflict on Edward's Queen, Elizabeth.
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  • ''A gentleman, Nurse, that loves to hear himself talk, and will speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 4, l. 147-9. Describing his friend Mercutio to the nurse; "stand to" means defend.
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  • ''Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions; fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 1, l. 59-64. His famous defence of the shared humanity of Jews.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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