William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The heavens hold firm
    The walls of thy dear honor; keep unshaked
    That temple, thy fair mind, that thou mayst stand
    T' enjoy thy banished lord and this great land!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Lord, in Cymbeline, act 2, sc. 1, l. 62-5. Speaking of Imogen and Posthumus, her husband.
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  • ''It is thyself, mine own self's better part:
    Mine eye's clear eye, my dear heart's dearer heart,
    My food, my fortune, and my sweet hope's aim,
    My sole earth's heaven, and my heaven's claim.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antipholus of Syracuse, in The Comedy of Errors, act 3, sc. 2, l. 61-4. To Luciana.
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  • ''He that loves to be flattered is worthy o' the flatterer.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Apemantus, in Timon of Athens, act 1, sc. 1, l. 226-7.
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  • ''He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat; it ever changes with the next block.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 75-7. Mocking Benedick as one who changes loyalty to friends (and perhaps religious faith) as often as he changes the fashion of his hat; "block" means mould.
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  • ''The finch, the sparrow, and the lark,
    The plainsong cuckoo grey,
    Whose note full many a man doth mark
    And dares not answer nay.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 1, l. 130-3. The cuckoo invades the nests of other birds, and is associated with cuckoldry; Bottom sings because he is afraid.
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  • ''Speak on, but be not over-tedious.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Burgundy, in Henry VI, Part 1, act 3, sc. 3, l. 43.
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  • ''Have you not love enough to bear with me,
    When that rash humor which my mother gave me
    Makes me forgetful?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 119-21. To Brutus; "rash humor" means hasty temper.
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  • ''O, what authority and show of truth
    Can cunning sin cover itself withal!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 35-6. To Leonatus, who, he thinks, is deceiving him; "authority" means assurance.
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  • ''He'll shake
    Your Rome about your ears.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cominius, in Coriolanus, act 4, sc. 6, l. 98-9. Said of Coriolanus, when news comes that he has joined with the Volscians against Rome.
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  • ''O that he were here to write me down an ass! But, masters, remember that I am an ass; though it be not written down, yet forget not that I am an ass.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 2, l. 75-8. Keen to have his own stupidity recorded for posterity.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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