William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Plague of your policy!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Earl of Surrey, in Henry VIII, act 3, sc. 2, l. 259. Wolsey contrived to have Surrey sent off to Ireland; "of" = on.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Hang thyself in thine own heir-apparent garters!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 2, 43-4. A friendly insult to Prince Hal, heir to the throne.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Thou wast a pretty fellow when thou hadst no need to care for her frowning; now thou art an O without a figure. I am better than thou art now; I am a fool, thou art nothing.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fool, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 4, l. 191-4. To King Lear, who has given his lands to his daughters; an O is nothing without another figure in front of it.
    4 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''I'the commonwealth I would by contraries
    Execute all things; for no kind of traffic
    Would I admit; no name of magistrate;
    Letters should not be known; riches, poverty,
    And use of service, none; contract, succession,
    Bourn, bound of land, tilth, vineyard, none;
    No use of metal, corn, or wine, or oil;
    No occupation; all men idle, all,
    And women too, but innocent and pure.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gonzalo, in The Tempest, act 2, sc. 1, l. 150-8. His utopian vision of a golden age with no rule and no boundaries ("Bourn, bound of land"); "traffic" means trade; "use of service" means employment of servants.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Will you see the players well bestowed? Do you hear, let them
    be well used, for they are the abstracts and brief chronicles of the time. After your death you were better have a bad epitaph than their ill report while you live.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 522-5. Speaking to Polonius about the actors who have just arrived in Elsinore; "bestowed" means lodged.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Before the time I did Lysander see,
    Seemed Athens as a paradise to me.
    O then, what graces in my love do dwell,
    That he hath turned a heaven unto a hell?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hermia, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 1, sc. 1, l. 204-7. Her "love" is Lysander, who has provoked the anger of her father and jealousy of Demetrius, and so made Athens hell for her.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''But men are men; the best sometimes forget.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3, l. 241. "Men are but men" is proverbial.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Jessica. I am never merry when I hear sweet music.
    Lorenzo. The reason is, your spirits are attentive.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Jessica and Lorenzo, in The Merchant of Venice, act 5, sc. 1, l. 69-70. "Spirits are attentive" means faculties are engaged.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''The man nearest my soul,
    Who like a brother toiled in my affairs,
    And laid his love and life under my foot.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 61-3. On Northumberland, once his friend, now his enemy.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''They love not poison that do poison need.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Richard II, act 5, sc. 6, l. 38. Unhappy to learn that Richard II has been killed at his own suggestion.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

[Report Error]