William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''He jests at scars that never felt a wound.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Romeo, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 1, l. 43 (1599). Spoken of Mercutio, who mocked Romeo's love-lorn state, in "the balcony scene."
    20 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''I'll not be made a soft and dull-eyed fool
    To shake the head, relent, and sigh, and yield
    To Christian intercessors.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 3, l. 14-6.
    14 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''Wilt thou draw near the nature of the gods?
    Draw near them then in being merciful.
    Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Tamora, in Titus Andronicus, act 1, sc. 1, l. 117-19. Begging Titus for mercy.
    14 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''What angel wakes me from my flow'ry bed?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titania, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 3, sc. 1. Woken by Bottom's singing.
    18 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''I see you what you are, you are too proud;
    But if you were the devil, you are fair.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Viola, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 5, l. 250-1. On Olivia; "if" means even if.
    16 person liked.
    6 person did not like.
  • ''He is himself alone,
    To answer all the city.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 1st Soldier, in Coriolanus, act 1, sc. 4, l. 51-2. On Caius Marcius, who has fought his way alone into the city of Corioli.
    15 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''Come on, poor babe,
    Some powerful spirit instruct the kites and ravens
    To be thy nurses. Wolves and bears, they say,
    Casting their savageness aside, have done
    Like offices of pity.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antigonus, in The Winter's Tale, act 2, sc. 3, l. 185-9. He obeys Leontes' command to deposit his baby daughter in a remote place.
    10 person liked.
    8 person did not like.
  • ''Fortune is merry,
    And in this mood will give us anything.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antony, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 2, l. 266-7. He has achieved his aim, to launch civil war.
    15 person liked.
    7 person did not like.
  • ''I pray you, how many hath he killed and eaten in these wars? But how many hath he killed? For indeed, I promised to eat all of his killing.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 42-5. Mocking Benedick's achievement as a soldier.
    10 person liked.
    6 person did not like.
  • ''My chief humor is for a tyrant. I could play Ercles rarely, or a part to tear a cat in, to make all split.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 1, sc. 2, l. 29-30. "Humor" means inclination; "Ercles" is Bottom's corruption of Hercules; to "tear a cat" on the stage is to rant and bluster.
    775 person liked.
    471 person did not like.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

O mistress mine, where are you roaming?
O stay and hear! your true-love's coming
That can sing both high and low;
Trip no further, pretty sweeting,
Journey's end in lovers' meeting-
Every wise man's son doth know.

What is love? 'tis not hereafter;
Present mirth hath present laughter;
What's to come is still unsure:
In delay there lies no plenty,-
Then come kiss me, Sweet and twenty,
Youth's a stuff will not endure.

Read the full of O Mistress Mine, Where Are You Roaming? (Twelfth Night, Act Ii, Scene Iii)

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

[Report Error]