William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The urging of that word "judgment" hath bred a kind of remorse in me.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. 2nd Murderer, in Richard III, act 1, sc. 4, l. 107-8. Commissioned to murder Clarence, he hesitates at the thought of doomsday, or the day of judgment (see Matthew 10:15, etc.).
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  • ''Sing, siren, for thyself, and I will dote;
    Spread o'er the silver waves thy golden hairs,
    And as a bed I'll take them, and there lie.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antipholus of Syracuse, in The Comedy of Errors, act 3, sc. 2, l. 47-9. To Luciana, who has been pleading with him on her sister's behalf; "take" means make use of.
  • ''Men shut their doors against a setting sun.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Apemantus, in Timon of Athens, act 1, sc. 2, l. 145. Foreshadowing the fall of Timon.
  • ''He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man; and he that is more than a youth is not for me, and he that is less than a man, I am not for him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Beatrice, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 36-9. Rejecting the idea of marrying.
  • ''The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report what my dream was!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Bottom, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 4, sc. 1, l. 211-4. Bottom confuses the senses, just as his dream is confused in recollection.
  • ''The time of universal peace is near.
    Prove this a prosp'rous day, the three-nooked world
    Shall bear the olive freely.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 4, sc. 6, l. 4-6. Anticipating peace; "Prove this" means "If this prove"; "three-nooked" means three-cornered.
  • ''We shall find of him
    A shrewd contriver; and, you know, his means,
    If he improve them, may well stretch so far
    As to annoy us all.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 1, l. 157-60. Arguing for killing Mark Antony as well as Caesar; "shrewd contriver" means cunning and dangerous schemer.
  • ''O, what men dare do! What men may do! What men daily do, not knowing what they do!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 19-20.
  • ''Conrade. Here, man, I am at thy elbow.
    Borachio. Mass, and my elbow itched; I thought there would a scab follow.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Conrade and Borachio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 3, l. 98-100. "Scab" means scoundrel, as well as the literal meaning.
  • ''An old man, sir, and his wits are not so blunt as, God help, I would desire they were; but, in faith, honest as the skin between his brows.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 5, l. 10-2. Commenting on his assistant, Verges, and, as often, in the word "blunt" (means sharp) saying the opposite of what he means; "honest as the skin between his brows" is proverbial.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxvi

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry,
As, to behold desert a beggar born,
And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And guilded honour shamefully misplaced,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgraced,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,

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