William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''The raven himself is hoarse
    That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan
    Under my battlements.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 5, l. 38-40. The croaking of the raven proverbially foreshadowed misfortune or death.
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  • ''You think I'll weep:
    No, I'll not weep.
    I have full cause of weeping, but this heart
    Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws
    Or ere I'll weep.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 282-6. "Flaws" means fragments; "Or ere" means before.
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  • ''Macbeth. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased,
    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,
    Raze out the written troubles of the brain,
    And with some sweet oblivious antidote
    Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous stuff
    Which weighs upon the heart?
    Doctor. Therein the patient
    Must minister to himself.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth and Doctor, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 3, l. 40-6. "Raze out" means erase; "oblivious" means producing forgetfulness; the "stuff" that weighs on the heart includes guilt for murder.
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  • ''Mamillius. What color are your eyebrows?
    1st Lady. Blue, my lord.
    Mamillius. Nay, that's a mock. I have seen a lady's nose
    That has been blue, but not her eyebrows.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Mamillius and 1st Lady, in The Winter's Tale, act 2, sc. 1, l. 13-5. Hermione's little son talks with court ladies.
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  • ''Get posts and letters, and make friends with speed;
    Never so few, and never yet more need.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Northumberland, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 1, l. 215. "Posts" were messengers who rode by stages where they changed horses.
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  • ''O spirit of love, how quick and fresh art thou.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orsino, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 1, l. 9. "Quick and fresh" means alert and vigorous.
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  • ''He hopes it is no other
    But for your health and your digestion sake,
    An after-dinner's breath.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Patroclus, in Troilus and Cressida, act 2, sc. 3, l. 110-12. The Greek leaders, calling on Achilles, meet with this rebuff.
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  • ''It provokes the desire but it takes away the performance. Therefore much drink may be said to be an equivocator with lechery: it makes him and it mars him; it sets him on and it takes him off.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Porter, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 3.
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  • ''This sleep is sound indeed, this is a sleep
    That from this golden rigol hath divorced
    So many English kings.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Henry, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 5, l. 35-7. "Rigol" means circle (compare "regal").
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  • ''O sir, you are old;
    Nature in you stands on the very verge
    Of his confine.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Regan, in King Lear, act 2, sc. 4, l. 146-8. "Confine" means limit, bounds.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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