William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Thou didst drink
    The stale of horses and the gilded puddle
    That beasts would cough at.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Antony and Cleopatra, act 1, sc. 4, l. 61-3. Hardships that Antony endured as a soldier; "stale" is urine.
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  • ''Those that with haste will make a mighty fire
    Begin it with weak straws.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 107-8. Meaning that a huge conflagration can quickly be started with a few worthless straws (and so may a revolution be begun from nothing).
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  • ''Silence is the perfectest herald of joy.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 1, l. 306. Unable to express his happiness on being offered Hero in marriage.
    7 person liked.
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  • ''Conrade. Away! You are an ass, you are an ass.
    Dogberry. Dost thou not suspect my place? Dost thou not suspect my years?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Conrade and Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 2, l. 73-5. As usual getting the word wrong; Dogberry means "respect," not "suspect."
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  • ''An honest soul, i'faith, sir, by my troth he is, as ever broke bread. But God is to be worshipped; all men are not alike.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 5, l. 38-40. Claiming his own superiority over Verges, his assistant as constable.
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  • ''As I stood here below, methought his eyes
    Were two full moons; he had a thousand noses,
    Horns whelked and waved like the enridgèd sea.
    It was some fiend.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edgar, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 6, l. 69-72. Deceiving has father into thinking he has been led by a fiend; "whelked" means twisted.
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  • ''A plague of all cowards, I say, and a vengeance too!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 4, l. 114-5. Blustering after running away himself from Hal and Poins; "of" means on.
    6 person liked.
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  • ''O proud death,
    What feast is toward in thine eternal cell,
    That thou so many princes at a shot
    So bloodily hast struck?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Fortinbras, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2, l. 364-7. "Toward" means in preparation; "eternal cell" means the grave.
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  • ''Though they are of monstrous shape, yet note
    Their manners are more gentle, kind, than of
    Our human generation you shall find
    Many, nay, almost any.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gonzalo, in The Tempest, act 3, sc. 3, l. 31-4. On the "strange shapes" that offer Alonso and his courtiers a banquet.
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  • ''There is special providence in the fall of a sparrow. If it be now, 'tis not to come; if it be not to come, it will be
    now; if it be not now, yet it will come—the readiness is
    all.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 5, sc. 2, l. 219-22.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain