William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I myself am best
    When least in company.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Orsino, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 4, l. 37-8. The lovesick Orsino prefers to be alone.
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  • ''Slander,
    Whose sting is sharper than the sword's.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Paulina, in The Winter's Tale, act 2, sc. 3, l. 86-7. Convinced that Hermione is wrongly accused and slandered.
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  • ''Portia. Why, know'st thou any harm's intended towards him?
    Soothsayer. None that I know will be, much that I fear may chance.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia and the Soothsayer, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 4, l. 31-2. The soothsayer fears for Caesar.
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  • ''Thy due from me
    Is tears and heavy sorrows of the blood,
    Which nature, love, and filial tenderness
    Shall, O dear father, pay thee plenteously.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince Henry, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 5, l. 37-40. Thinking his father is dead.
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  • ''Richard. Harp not on that string, madam, that is past.
    Queen Elizabeth. Harp on it still shall I till heart-strings break.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, and Queen Elizabeth in Richard III, act 4, sc. 4, l. 364-5. He wants to talk of marriage, but she reminds him of the murders he has perpetrated.
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  • ''I must comfort the weaker vessel, as doublet and hose ought
    to show itself courageous to petticoat.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 2, sc. 4, l. 5-7. in disguise as a boy; "the weaker vessel" is woman, a biblical phrase (Paul's first epistle to Peter, 3.7).
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  • ''Thou call'st me dog before thou hadst a cause,
    But since I am a dog, beware my fangs.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Shylock, in The Merchant of Venice, act 3, sc. 3, l. 6-7. Threatening Antonio.
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  • ''A man in all the world's new fashion planted,
    That hath a mint of phrases in his brain.
    One who the music of his own vain tongue
    Doth ravish like enchanting harmony.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. The King, in Love's Labor's Lost, act 1, sc. 1, l. 164-7. Commenting on Armado and his extravagant language.
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  • ''When will this fearful slumber have an end?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Titus, in Titus Andronicus, act 3, sc. 1, l. 252. Thinking all the horrors that have happened may be a dream.
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  • ''There is a history in all men's lives,
    Figuring the natures of the times deceased,
    The which observed, a man may prophesy,
    With a near aim, of the main chance of things
    As yet not come to life.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Warwick, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 3, sc. 1, l. 80-4. A chain of events ("history") in everyone's past life may indicate pretty well ("with a near aim") the likely shape of things to come.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Fear No More

Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
Nor the furious winter's rages,
Thou thy worldly task hast done,
Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
Golden lads and girls all must,
As chimney sweepers come to dust.

Fear no more the frown of the great,
Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
Care no more to clothe and eat;
To thee the reed is as the oak:
The sceptre, learning, physic, must
All follow this, and come to dust.

Fear no more the lightning-flash,
Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
Fear not slander, censure rash;
Thou hast finished joy ...

Read the full of Fear No More

Sonnet Cviii

What's in the brain that ink may character
Which hath not figured to thee my true spirit?
What's new to speak, what new to register,
That may express my love or thy dear merit?
Nothing, sweet boy; but yet, like prayers divine,
I must, each day say o'er the very same,
Counting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
Even as when first I hallow'd thy fair name.
So that eternal love in love's fresh case

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