William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Et tu, Brute?—Then fall, Caesar!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 77. There is no classical source for Caesar's famous last words, which seem to have become well known in Shakespeare's age, although he did not invent them.
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  • ''In such a time as this it is not meet
    That every nice offence should bear his comment.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 7-8. To Brutus; "nice" means trivial; "bear his comment" means be subject to criticism.
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  • ''How sweetly you do minister to love,
    That know love's grief by his complexion!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudio, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 1, sc. 1, l. 312-3. Grief means pangs; the lover typically had a pale appearance (complexion).
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  • ''Why, he was met even now
    As mad as the vexed sea, singing aloud,
    Crowned with rank fumiter and furrow-weeds,
    With hardocks, hemlock, nettles, cuckoo-flowers,
    Darnel, and all the idle weeds that grow
    In our sustaining corn.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cordelia, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 4, l. 1-6. The mad king has crowned himself with useless ("idle") weeds.
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  • ''The most peaceable way for you, if you do take a thief, is to let him show himself what he is and steal out of your company.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 3, l. 57-60. The incompetent constable instructs the watchmen who patrol the town at night.
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  • ''Think that the clearest gods, who make them honors
    Of men's impossibilities, have preserved thee.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edgar, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 6, l. 73-4. Making his father believe he has fallen off a cliff and survived.
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  • ''Before I knew thee, Hal, I knew nothing, and now am I, if a
    man should speak truly, little better than one of the wicked.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 1, sc. 2, l. 92-5. Blaming his faults on Prince Hal.
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  • ''I saw him beat the surges under him,
    And ride upon their backs. He trod the water,
    Whose enmity he flung aside, and breasted
    The surge most swoll'n that met him.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Francisco, in The Tempest, act 2, sc. 1, l. 115-8. Telling Alonso that his son may be safe.
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  • ''All things that are
    Are with more spirit chased than enjoyed.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gratiano, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 6, l. 12-3. Referring to Lorenzo's plan to elope with Jessica.
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  • ''You would play upon me, you would seem to know my stops, you
    would pluck out the heart of my mystery, you would sound me
    from my lowest note to the top of my compass; and there is
    much music, excellent voice, in this little organ.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 364-8. Hamlet shows Guildenstern he is more difficult to comprehend and play on than a recorder.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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