William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Caesar should be a beast without a heart
    If he should stay at home today for fear.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 2, l. 42-3. In spite of bad omens, he is determined to go to the Capitol.
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  • ''Do not presume too much upon my love,
    I may do that I shall be sorry for.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 63-4. Quarreling with Brutus.
  • ''Claudius. But now, my cousin Hamlet, and my son—
    Hamlet. [Aside] A little more than kin, and less than kind.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudius and Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 64-5. "Cousin" means kinsman, here a nephew; Hamlet is more closely related than a nephew, since his uncle has married his mother, yet less close than a son, and not well disposed to Claudius.
  • ''You have begot me, bred me, loved me. I
    Return those duties back as are right fit,
    Obey you, love you, and most honor you.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cordelia, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 96-8. Speaking to her father; the last line curiously echoes the marriage service.
  • ''You are thought here to be the most senseless and fit man for the constable of the watch, therefore bear you the lantern.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Dogberry to the first watchman, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 3. Venting one of his many malapropisms ("senseless" for sensible).
  • ''The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices
    Make instruments to plague us.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edgar, in King Lear, act 5, sc. 3, l. 171-2. Speaking to his half-brother, the dying Edmund, whose vices have led to his death, just as their father Gloucester's vices have brought about his blinding.
  • ''A plague upon it when thieves cannot be true one to another!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 1, act 2, sc. 2, l. 27-8. His companions have taken his horse, and Falstaff is too fat to walk far.
  • ''Pause awhile,
    And let my counsel sway you in this case.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Friar Francis, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 4, sc. 1, l. 200-1. Trying to help the distraught Leonato.
  • ''Who riseth from a feast
    With that keen appetite that he sits down?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gratiano, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 6, l. 8-9.
  • ''It is as easy as lying. Govern these ventages with your fingers and thumbs, give it breath with your mouth, and it will discourse most eloquent music.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 2, l. 357-9. To Guildenstern, who cannot play the recorder; "ventages" are stops on the instrument.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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