William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Poor and content is rich, and rich enough,
    But riches fineless is as poor as winter
    To him that ever fears he shall be poor.
    Good God, the souls of all my tribe defend
    From jealousy!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Othello (III, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''I have heard it said
    There is an art which in their piedness shares
    With great creating nature.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Perdita, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 86-8. She is thinking of grafting or the cross-breeding that produces particolored flowers ("piedness").
  • ''Who can converse with a dumb show?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 2, l. 73. Referring to her English suitor, who speaks no Italian.
  • ''"All that glistens is not gold,
    Often have you heard that told;
    Many a man his life hath sold
    But my outside to behold.
    Gilded tombs do worms infold.
    Had you been as wise as bold,
    Young in limbs, in judgment old,
    Your answer had not been inscrolled.
    Fare you well, your suit is cold."''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince of Morocco, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 7, l. 65-73. The message set down ("inscrolled") in the golden casket, beginning with a well-known proverb.
  • ''He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber
    To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 1, sc. 1, l. 13. The warrior has become the courtier in peacetime.
  • ''Treason is not inherited, my lord.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Rosalind, in As You Like It, act 1, sc. 3, l. 61. Protesting her innocence after her father has been banished.
  • ''Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea,
    But sad mortality o'ersways their power,
    How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea,
    Whose action is no stronger than a flower?
    O how shall summer's honey breath hold out
    Against the wrackful siege of batt'ring days,
    When rocks impregnable are not so stout,
    Nor gates of steel so strong but time decays?
    O fearful meditation, where alack,
    Shall Time's best jewel from Time's chest lie hid?
    Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back,
    Or who his spoil of beauty can forbid?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea (l. 1-12). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''For do but note a wild and wanton herd
    Or race of youthful and unhandled colts
    Fetching mad bounds, bellowing and neighing loud,
    Which is the hot condition of their blood;
    If they but hear perchance a trumpet sound,
    Or any air of music touch their ears,
    You shall perceive them make a mutual stand,
    Their savage eyes turned to a modest gaze
    By the sweet power of music.''
    William Shake{peare (1564-1616), British poet. The Merchant of Venice (V, i). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Truly, thou art damned, like an ill-roasted egg, all
    on one side.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Touchstone, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 37-8. Part of a sophistical argument that Corin is damned for not being at court.
  • ''Peace puts forth her olive everywhere.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Westmoreland, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 4, l. 87. The olive-branch, a traditional symbol of peace.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

[Report Error]