William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''That which hath made them drunk hath made me bold;
    What hath quenched them hath given me fire.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 2, l. 1-2. Referring to the wine she has given Duncan's attendants.
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  • ''You must bear with me.
    Pray you now, forget and forgive; I am old and foolish.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lear, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 7, l. 82-3. Asking forgiveness of his daughter Cordelia.
  • ''Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible
    To feeling as to sight? Or art thou but
    A dagger of the mind, a false creation
    Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 2, sc. 1, l. 36-9. The vision is "fatal" as prompting him to murder; "heat-oppressed means fevered.
  • ''Maria. Nay, but say true, does it work upon him?
    Sir Toby Belch. Like aqua vitae with a midwife.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Maria and Sir Toby Belch, in Twelfth Night, act 2, sc. 4, l. 195-6. "Aqua vitae," the water of life, means brandy or other spirits.
  • ''Our dates are brief, and therefore we admire
    What thou dost foist upon us that is old,''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. No, Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change (l. 5-6). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''Think'st thou I'd make a life of jealousy,
    To follow still the changes of the moon
    With fresh suspicions? No! To be once in doubt
    Is once to be resolv'd. Exchange me for a goat
    When I shall turn the business of my soul
    To such exsufflicate and blown surmises,
    Matching thy inference. 'Tis not to make me jealous
    To say my wife is fair, feeds well, loves company,
    Is free of speech, sings, plays, and dances well;
    Where virtue is, these are more virtuous.
    Nor from mine own weak merits will I draw
    The smallest fear or doubt of her revolt,
    For she had eyes, and chose me. No, Iago,
    I'll see before I doubt; when I doubt, prove;
    And on the proof, there is no more but this—
    Away at once with love or jealousy!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. Othello (III, iii). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''O Lady Fortune,
    Stand you auspicious!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Perdita, in The Winter's Tale, act 4, sc. 4, l. 51-2. Hoping nothing will prevent her marriage to the prince Florizel.
  • ''I may neither choose who I would, nor refuse who I dislike; so is the will of a living daughter curbed by the will of a dead father.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Portia, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 2, l. 23-5. Playing on "will" as desire and as testament.
  • ''From the four corners of the earth they come
    To kiss this shrine, this mortal-breathing saint.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Prince of Morocco, in The Merchant of Venice, act 2, sc. 7, l. 39-40. In adoration of Portia.
  • ''Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Richard, in Richard III, act 1, sc. 1, l. 5. At the end of the civil wars that plagued the reign of Henry VI.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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