William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''You are come in very happy time
    To bear my greeting to the senators
    And tell them that I will not come today.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 2, l. 60-2. To Decius, who has come to fetch him to the senate chamber.
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • ''Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
    Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,
    Can be retentive to the strength of spirit.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 93-5. Trying to persuade Casca that they will have no freedom under Caesar.
  • ''Why should we in our peevish opposition
    Take it to heart?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudius, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 100-1. Suggesting Hamlet is perverse in continuing to mourn for his father.
  • ''Time shall unfold what plighted cunning hides,
    Who covers faults at last shame them derides.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cordelia, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 280-1. Compare the proverb, "Time brings truth to light"; "plighted" means pleated.
  • ''Come, I'll be friends with thee, Jack. Thou art going to the
    wars, and whether I shall ever see thee again or no, there is
    nobody cares.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Doll Tearsheet, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 4, l. 65-8. Bidding goodbye to Falstaff.
  • ''How fearful
    And dizzy 'tis, to cast one's eyes so low!
    The crows and choughs that wing the midway air
    Show scarce so gross as beetles. Half way down
    Hangs one that gathers samphire, dreadful trade!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edgar, in King Lear, act 4, sc. 6, l. 11-15. Imagining the prospect from the cliffs at Dover; "choughs" means crows or jackdaws; "gross" means large; samphire is a herb used in pickling.
  • ''Now comes in the sweetest morsel of the night, and we must
    hence and leave it unpicked.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 4, l. 367-8. Summoned to the wars, he cannot go to bed with Doll Tearsheet; "unpicked" means ungathered.
  • ''A lover may bestride the gossamers
    That idles in the wanton summer air,
    And yet not fall; so light is vanity.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Friar Lawrence, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 6, l. 18-20. On Juliet's arrival, "light of foot"; "wanton" means playful.
  • ''Let me play the fool,
    With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gratiano, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 1, l. 79-80. Preferring to enjoy life, and rejecting Antonio's melancholy.
  • ''They are actions that a man might play,
    But I have that within which passes show,
    These but the trappings and the suits of woe.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 1, sc. 2, l. 84-6. "Actions" means outward forms of mourning.

Read more quotations »
Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Lxxvii

Thy glass will show thee how thy beauties wear,
Thy dial how thy precious minutes waste;
The vacant leaves thy mind's imprint will bear,
And of this book this learning mayst thou taste.
The wrinkles which thy glass will truly show
Of mouthed graves will give thee memory;
Thou by thy dial's shady stealth mayst know
Time's thievish progress to eternity.
Look, what thy memory can not contain

[Report Error]