William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''My talk to thee must be how Benedick
    Is sick in love with Beatrice. Of this matter
    Is little Cupid's crafty arrow made,
    That only wounds by hearsay.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hero, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 3, sc. 1, l. 20-3. Plotting with Ursula to make Beatrice fall in love with Benedick.
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  • ''Good name in man and woman, dear my lord,
    Is the immediate jewel of their souls.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 3, sc. 3, l. 155-6. Iago praises reputation to Othello, having earlier made little of it to Cassio at act 2, sc. 3, l. 263-4.
  • ''His rash fierce blaze of riot cannot last,
    For violent fires soon burn out themselves;
    Small showers last long, but sudden storms are short.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. John of Gaunt, in Richard II, act 2, sc. 1, l. 33-5. Referring to Richard.
  • ''Thou wilt be a wilderness again,
    Peopled with wolves, thy old inhabitants!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 5, l. 136-7. Referring to his kingdom.
  • ''Orpheus with his Lute made Trees,
    And the Mountaine tops that freeze,
    Bow themselves when he did sing.
    To his Musicke, Plants and Flowers
    Ever spring; as Sunne and Showres,
    There had been a lasting Spring.
    Every thing that heard him play,
    Even the Billowes of the Sea,
    Hung their heads, and then lay by.
    In sweet Musicke is such Art,
    Killing care, and griefe of heart,
    Fall asleepe, or hearing dye.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. King Henry VIII (by Shakespeare and probably John Fletcher) (III, i). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.
  • ''To beguile the time,
    Look like the time, bear welcome in your eye,
    Your hand, your tongue; look like the innocent flower,
    But be the serpent under't.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Lady Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 1, sc. 5, l. 63-6. "To beguile the time, Look like the time" means to deceive people, behave as they do ("time" means society at large); the idea of the snake in the grass is proverbial.
  • ''Whose loves
    Are dearer than the natural bond of sisters.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Le Beau, in As You Like It, act 1, sc. 2, l. 275-6. Speaking of the cousins, Rosalind and Celia.
  • ''Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honor, breath
    Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Macbeth, in Macbeth, act 5, sc. 3, l. 27-8. "Mouth-honor" means merely superficial respect.
  • ''Thought is free.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Maria, in Twelfth Night, act 1, sc. 3, l. 69. To Sir Andrew Aguecheek, meaning "you may think what you like."
  • ''No, Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British poet. No, Time, thou shalt not boast that I do change (l. 1). . . The Unabridged William Shakespeare, William George Clark and William Aldis Wright, eds. (1989) Running Press.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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