William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''Two may keep counsel when the third's away.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Aaron, in Titus Andronicus, act 4, sc. 2, l. 144. He kills the nurse he is speaking to so that she cannot betray him; she is the "third" who knows about the birth of his daughter; proverbial.
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  • ''I do oppose
    My patience to his fury, and am armed
    To suffer, with a quietness of spirit,
    The very tyranny and rage of his.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antonio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 4, sc. 1, l. 10-3. Referring to Shylock's cruelty ("tyranny").
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  • ''Against ill chances men are ever merry,
    But heaviness foreruns the good event.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Archbishop of York, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, sc. 2, l. 81-2. Anticipating ("Against") bad luck men are merry, but sad or heavy before success.
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  • ''O thou goddess,
    Thou divine Nature, thou thyself thou blazon'st
    In these two princely boys!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Belarius, in Cymbeline, act 4, sc. 2, l. 169-71. Speaking of Guiderius and Arviragus, whom Belarius knows to be the king's sons; to "blazon" is to display, like a coat of arms.
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  • ''Sorrow breaks seasons and reposing hours,
    Makes the night morning and the noontide night.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brakenbury, in Richard III, act 1, sc. 4, l. 76-7. Commenting on Clarence, whose terrible dream kept him awake all night.
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  • ''So in the world: 'tis furnished well with men,
    And men are flesh and blood, and apprehensive;
    Yet in the number I do know but one
    That unassailable holds on his rank,
    Unshaked of motion; and that I am he.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 3, sc. 1, l. 66-70. Boasting of his steadiness in holding his position unshaken by movement around him, or by "motions" means petitions; "apprehensive" means capable of perception.
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  • ''Well, Brutus, thou art noble, yet I see
    Thy honorable mettle may be wrought
    From that it is disposed.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 2, l. 308-10. Realizing Brutus's spirit ("mettle") may be diverted from the course he is disposed to follow.
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  • ''Try what repentance can. What can it not?
    Yet what can it, when one cannot repent?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudius, in Hamlet, act 3, sc. 3, l. 65-6.
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  • ''I cannot heave
    My heart into my mouth. I love your Majesty
    According to my bond, no more nor less.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cordelia, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 1, l. 91-3. "Bond" disturbingly suggests the natural tie between father and child, but also a formal agreement or limitation, and a fetter.
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  • ''By my troth, I kiss thee with a most constant heart.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Doll Tearsheet, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 2, sc. 4, l. 269-70. The old whore speaking to old Falstaff.
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to Time thou grow'st.
So long as men can breathe, or ...

Read the full of Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer's Day? (Sonnet 18)

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?