William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''I see my reputation is at stake,
    My fame is shrewdly gored.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Achilles, in Troilus and Cressida, act 3, sc. 3, l. 227. Shrewdly gored = badly wounded; responding to Ulysses.
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  • ''Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Antonio, in The Merchant of Venice, act 1, sc. 1, l. 51. On the strange eccentricities of human behavior.
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  • ''Past and to come seems best; things present, worst.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Archbishop of York, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 3, l. 108. Everything seems to be at its worst for the rebels.
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  • ''How hard it is to hide the sparks of nature!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Belarius, in Cymbeline, act 3, sc. 3, l. 79. Seeing the innate nobility of the king's sons, living with him in exile.
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  • ''Brutus. Now, as you are a Roman, tell me true.
    Messala. Then like a Roman bear the truth I tell,
    For certain she is dead, and by strange manner.
    Brutus. Why, farewell, Portia. We must die, Messala.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Brutus and Messala, in Julius Caesar, act 4, sc. 3, l. 187-90. Brutus's stoic response to the news of the death of his wife.
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  • ''It seems to me most strange that men should fear,
    Seeing that death, a necessary end,
    Will come when it will come.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Caesar, in Julius Caesar, act 2, sc. 2, l. 35-7. The idea the nothing is more certain than death, and nothing more uncertain than the time it will come, is proverbial.
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  • ''Three parts of him
    Is ours already, and the man entire
    Upon the next encounter yields him ours.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Cassius, in Julius Caesar, act 1, sc. 3, l. 154-6. Using devious means to win the support of Brutus.
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  • ''There lives within the very flame of love
    A kind of wick or snuff that will abate it.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Claudius, in Hamlet, act 4, sc. 7, l. 114-5. "Snuff" means charred portion of the wick.
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  • ''I know the more one sickens the worse at ease he is.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Corin, in As You Like It, act 3, sc. 2, l. 23-4. On the basic facts of life.
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  • ''Any bar, any cross, any impediment will be medicinable to me.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Don John, in Much Ado About Nothing, act 2, sc. 2, l. 4-5. Hoping to prevent by any means the marriage of Claudio and Hero; any obstacle will do him good ("be medicinable").
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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

A Fairy Song

Over hill, over dale,
Thorough bush, thorough brier,
Over park, over pale,
Thorough flood, thorough fire!
I do wander everywhere,
Swifter than the moon's sphere;
And I serve the Fairy Queen,
To dew her orbs upon the green;
The cowslips tall her pensioners be;
In their gold coats spots you see;
Those be rubies, fairy favours;
In those freckles live their savours;
I must go seek some dewdrops here,
And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.

Read the full of A Fairy Song

Sonnet Ci

O truant Muse, what shall be thy amends
For thy neglect of truth in beauty dyed?
Both truth and beauty on my love depends;
So dost thou too, and therein dignified.
Make answer, Muse: wilt thou not haply say
'Truth needs no colour, with his colour fix'd;
Beauty no pencil, beauty's truth to lay;
But best is best, if never intermix'd?'
Because he needs no praise, wilt thou be dumb?

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