William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

William Shakespeare Quotes

  • ''This is the excellent foppery of the world: that when we are sick in fortune—often the surfeits of our own behaviour—we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion, knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical predominance, drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence.... An admirable evasion of whoremaster man, to lay his goatish disposition on the charge of a star!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Edmond, in King Lear, act 1, sc. 2, l. 116-26 (1623).
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  • ''All you that kiss my Lady Peace at home.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Falstaff, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 1, sc. 2, l. 207-8. To the Chief Justice, as Falstaff goes off to fight rebels.
  • ''Care keeps his watch in every old man's eye,
    And where care lodges, sleep will never lie;
    But where unbruisèd youth with unstuffed brain
    Doth couch his limbs, there golden sleep doth reign.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Friar Lawrence, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 3, l. 35-8. The old Friar is interrupted early in the morning by Romeo.
  • ''O this learning, what a thing it is!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Gremio, in The Taming of the Shrew, act 1, sc. 2, l. 159. The foolish Gremio admires learning.
  • ''I have heard
    That guilty creatures sitting at a play
    Have by the very cunning of the scene
    Been struck so to the soul, that presently
    They have proclaimed their malefactions.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hamlet, in Hamlet, act 2, sc. 2, l. 588-92. Thinking of ways to expose Claudius's guilt; "malefactions" means crimes, evil-doing.
  • ''The moon, like to a silver bow
    New bent in heaven, shall behold the night
    Of our solemnities.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Hippolyta, in A Midsummer Night's Dream, act 1, sc. 1, l. 9-11. To Theseus, whom she is to marry.
  • ''And what's he then that says I play the villain,
    When this advice is free I give, and honest,
    Probal to thinking, and indeed the course
    To win the Moor again?''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Iago, in Othello, act 2, sc. 3, l. 336-9. Addressing the audience after advising Cassio to apply to Desdemona; "probal" means reasonable.
  • ''Now is the sun upon the highmost hill
    Of this day's journey.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. Juliet, in Romeo and Juliet, act 2, sc. 5, l. 9-10. It is noon, and she has been waiting three hours for her nurse to return.
  • ''An angel is like you, Kate, and you are like an angel.''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry, in Henry V, act 5, sc. 2, l. 109-10. Wooing Katherine of France.
  • ''I know thee not, old man. Fall to thy prayers.
    How ill white hairs becomes a fool and jester!''
    William Shakespeare (1564-1616), British dramatist, poet. King Henry V, in Henry IV, Part 2, act 5, sc. 5, l. 47-8. His famous rejection of his old companion, Falstaff.

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Best Poem of William Shakespeare

All The World's A Stage

All the world's a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in ...

Read the full of All The World's A Stage

Sonnet Li

Thus can my love excuse the slow offence
Of my dull bearer when from thee I speed:
From where thou art why should I haste me thence?
Till I return, of posting is no need.
O, what excuse will my poor beast then find,
When swift extremity can seem but slow?
Then should I spur, though mounted on the wind;
In winged speed no motion shall I know:
Then can no horse with my desire keep pace;

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