William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

William Wordsworth Quotes

  • ''we are laid asleep
    In body, and become a living soul:
    While with an eye made quiet by the power
    Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,
    We see into the life of things.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey (l. 46-50). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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  • ''A day
    Spent in a round of strenuous idleness.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude, bk. 4, l. 376-7 (1850).
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  • ''With an eye made quiet by the power
    Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,
    We see into the life of things.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 48-50, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
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  • ''my brain
    Worked with a dim and undetermined sense
    Of unknown modes of being; o'er my thoughts
    There hung a darkness, call it solitude
    Or blank desertion.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 391-395). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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  • ''Hearing often-times
    The still, sad music of humanity,
    Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power
    To chasten and subdue.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 90-3, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
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  • ''Fair seed-time had my soul, and I grew up
    Fostered alike by beauty and by fear:''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 301-302). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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  • ''For I have learned
    To look on nature, not as in the hour
    Of thoughtless youth, but hearing oftentimes
    The still, sad music of humanity.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 89-92, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
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  • ''Wisdom and Spirit of the universe!
    Thou Soul that art the eternity of thought,
    That givest to forms and images a breath
    And everlasting motion,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 401-404). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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  • ''that blessed mood,
    In which the burthen of the mystery,
    In which the heavy and the weary weight
    Of all this unintelligible world
    Is lightened:—''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey (l. 38-42). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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  • ''Dust as we are, the immortal spirit grows
    Like harmony in music; there is a dark
    Inscrutable workmanship that reconciles
    Discordant elements, makes them cling together
    In one society.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 340-344). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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Best Poem of William Wordsworth

A Night Thought

Lo! where the Moon along the sky
Sails with her happy destiny;
Oft is she hid from mortal eye
Or dimly seen,
But when the clouds asunder fly
How bright her mien!

Far different we--a froward race,
Thousands though rich in Fortune's grace
With cherished sullenness of pace
Their way pursue,
Ingrates who wear a smileless face
The whole year through.

If kindred humours e'er would make
My spirit droop for drooping's sake,
From Fancy following in thy wake,
Bright ship of heaven!
A counter impulse let me take
And be forgiven.

Read the full of A Night Thought

The Trosachs

THERE 's not a nook within this solemn Pass,
   But were an apt confessional for one
   Taught by his summer spent, his autumn gone,
That Life is but a tale of morning grass
Wither'd at eve. From scenes of art which chase
   That thought away, turn, and with watchful eyes
   Feed it 'mid Nature's old felicities,
Rocks, rivers, and smooth lakes more clear than glass
Untouch'd, unbreathed upon. Thrice happy quest,

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