William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

William Wordsworth Quotes

  • ''we are laid asleep
    In body, and become a living soul:
    While with an eye made quiet by the power
    Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,
    We see into the life of things.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey (l. 46-50). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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  • ''A day
    Spent in a round of strenuous idleness.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude, bk. 4, l. 376-7 (1850).
  • ''With an eye made quiet by the power
    Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,
    We see into the life of things.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 48-50, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
  • ''my brain
    Worked with a dim and undetermined sense
    Of unknown modes of being; o'er my thoughts
    There hung a darkness, call it solitude
    Or blank desertion.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 391-395). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Hearing often-times
    The still, sad music of humanity,
    Nor harsh nor grating, though of ample power
    To chasten and subdue.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 90-3, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
  • ''Fair seed-time had my soul, and I grew up
    Fostered alike by beauty and by fear:''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 301-302). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''For I have learned
    To look on nature, not as in the hour
    Of thoughtless youth, but hearing oftentimes
    The still, sad music of humanity.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 89-92, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
  • ''Wisdom and Spirit of the universe!
    Thou Soul that art the eternity of thought,
    That givest to forms and images a breath
    And everlasting motion,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 401-404). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''that blessed mood,
    In which the burthen of the mystery,
    In which the heavy and the weary weight
    Of all this unintelligible world
    Is lightened:—''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey (l. 38-42). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''Dust as we are, the immortal spirit grows
    Like harmony in music; there is a dark
    Inscrutable workmanship that reconciles
    Discordant elements, makes them cling together
    In one society.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 340-344). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).

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Best Poem of William Wordsworth

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I ...

Read the full of I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

The Mother's Return

A MONTH, sweet Little-ones, is past
Since your dear Mother went away,---
And she tomorrow will return;
Tomorrow is the happy day.

O blessed tidings! thought of joy!
The eldest heard with steady glee;
Silent he stood; then laughed amain,---
And shouted, ' Mother, come to me!'

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