William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

William Wordsworth Quotes

  • ''Knowing that Nature never did betray
    The heart that loved her,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey (l. 123-124). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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  • ''though mean
    Our object and inglorious, yet the end
    Was not ignoble.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 324-326). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''in the mind of man,
    A motion and a spirit, that impels
    All thinking things, all objects of all thought,
    And rolls through all things.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey (l. 100-103). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''I heard among the solitary hills
    Low breathings coming after me,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 322-323). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''That blessed mood
    In which the burthen of the mystery,
    In which the heavy and the weary weight
    Of all this unintelligible world
    Is lightened.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 38-42, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
  • ''the soul,
    Remembering how she felt, but what she felt
    Remembering not, retains an obscure sense
    Of possible sublimity,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; II. School-Time (Conclusion) (l. 315-318). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Have I not reason to lament
    What Man has made of Man?''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Written in Early Spring (l. 23-24). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''I was the Dreamer, they the Dream; I roam'd
    Delighted, through the motley spectacle;
    Gowns grave or gaudy, Doctors, Students, Streets,
    Lamps, Gateways, Flocks of Churches, Courts and Towers:''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; III. Residence at Cambridge (l. 28-31). . . Faber Book of Poems and Places, The. Geoffrey Grigson, ed. (1980) Faber and Faber.
  • ''And 'tis my faith that every flower
    Enjoys the air it breathes.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Written in Early Spring (l. 11-12). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''where the Statue stood
    Of Newton, with his Prism and silent Face
    The marble index of a Mind for ever
    Voyaging through strange seas of Thought, alone.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude; III. Residence at Cambridge (l. 58-61). . . Faber Book of Poems and Places, The. Geoffrey Grigson, ed. (1980) Faber and Faber.

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Best Poem of William Wordsworth

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I ...

Read the full of I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

The Trosachs

THERE 's not a nook within this solemn Pass,
   But were an apt confessional for one
   Taught by his summer spent, his autumn gone,
That Life is but a tale of morning grass
Wither'd at eve. From scenes of art which chase
   That thought away, turn, and with watchful eyes
   Feed it 'mid Nature's old felicities,
Rocks, rivers, and smooth lakes more clear than glass
Untouch'd, unbreathed upon. Thrice happy quest,

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