William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

William Wordsworth Quotes

  • ''Knowing that Nature never did betray
    The heart that loved her,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey (l. 123-124). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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  • ''though mean
    Our object and inglorious, yet the end
    Was not ignoble.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 324-326). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''in the mind of man,
    A motion and a spirit, that impels
    All thinking things, all objects of all thought,
    And rolls through all things.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey (l. 100-103). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''I heard among the solitary hills
    Low breathings coming after me,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; I. Childhood and School-Time (l. 322-323). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''That blessed mood
    In which the burthen of the mystery,
    In which the heavy and the weary weight
    Of all this unintelligible world
    Is lightened.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey, l. 38-42, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
  • ''the soul,
    Remembering how she felt, but what she felt
    Remembering not, retains an obscure sense
    Of possible sublimity,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; II. School-Time (Conclusion) (l. 315-318). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Have I not reason to lament
    What Man has made of Man?''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Written in Early Spring (l. 23-24). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''I was the Dreamer, they the Dream; I roam'd
    Delighted, through the motley spectacle;
    Gowns grave or gaudy, Doctors, Students, Streets,
    Lamps, Gateways, Flocks of Churches, Courts and Towers:''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. THE PRELUDE; III. Residence at Cambridge (l. 28-31). . . Faber Book of Poems and Places, The. Geoffrey Grigson, ed. (1980) Faber and Faber.
  • ''And 'tis my faith that every flower
    Enjoys the air it breathes.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Lines Written in Early Spring (l. 11-12). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''where the Statue stood
    Of Newton, with his Prism and silent Face
    The marble index of a Mind for ever
    Voyaging through strange seas of Thought, alone.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Prelude; III. Residence at Cambridge (l. 58-61). . . Faber Book of Poems and Places, The. Geoffrey Grigson, ed. (1980) Faber and Faber.

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Best Poem of William Wordsworth

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I ...

Read the full of I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

The Mother's Return

A MONTH, sweet Little-ones, is past
Since your dear Mother went away,---
And she tomorrow will return;
Tomorrow is the happy day.

O blessed tidings! thought of joy!
The eldest heard with steady glee;
Silent he stood; then laughed amain,---
And shouted, ' Mother, come to me!'

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