William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

William Wordsworth Quotes

  • ''Our birth is but a sleep and a forgetting:
    The Soul that rises with us, our life's Star,
    Hath had elsewhere its setting,
    And cometh from afar:''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 58-61). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    44 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • ''One impulse from a vernal wood
    May teach you more of man,
    Of moral evil and of good,
    Than all the sages can.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Tables Turned, st. 6, Lyrical Ballads (1798).
    21 person liked.
    4 person did not like.
  • ''Earth fills her lap with pleasures of her own;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 77). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    18 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''No fountain from its rocky cave
    E'er tripped with foot so free;
    She seemed as happy as a wave
    That dances on the sea.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The Two April Mornings (l. 49-52). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    16 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • ''Though nothing can bring back the hour
    Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower;
    We will grieve not, rather find
    Strength in what remains behind;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 177-180). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    99 person liked.
    6 person did not like.
  • ''The world is too much with us; late and soon,
    Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. "The World is Too Much With Us," Sonnet 33, Miscellaneous Sonnets (1807). Opening lines.
    33 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''Thou, whose exterior semblance doth belie
    Thy Soul's immensity;
    Thou best Philosopher, who yet dost keep
    Thy heritage, thou Eye among the blind,
    That, deaf and silent, read'st the eternal deep,
    Haunted for ever by the eternal mind,—''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 108-113). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    12 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • ''Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. "The World Is Too Much With Us," Miscellaneous Sonnets (1827).
    23 person liked.
    8 person did not like.
  • ''The Rainbow comes and goes,
    And lovely is the Rose,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 10-11). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    21 person liked.
    5 person did not like.
  • ''I'd rather be
    A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
    So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
    Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
    Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
    Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. The World Is Too Much with Us (l. 10-14). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    13 person liked.
    3 person did not like.

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Best Poem of William Wordsworth

She Dwelt Among The Untrodden Ways

She dwelt among the untrodden ways
Beside the springs of Dove,
Maid whom there were none to praise
And very few to love:

A violet by a mossy stone
Half hidden from the eye!
---Fair as a star, when only one
Is shining in the sky.

She lived unknown, and few could know
When Lucy ceased to be;
But she is in her grave, and, oh,
The difference to me!

Read the full of She Dwelt Among The Untrodden Ways

Stanzas

WITHIN our happy castle there dwelt One
Whom without blame I may not overlook;
For never sun on living creature shone
Who more devout enjoyment with us took:
Here on his hours he hung as on a book,
On his own time here would he float away,
As doth a fly upon a summer brook;
But go tomorrow, or belike today,
Seek for him,---he is fled; and whither none can say.

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