William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

William Wordsworth Quotes

  • ''The innocent brightness of a new-born Day
    Is lovely yet;
    The Clouds that gather round the setting sun
    Do take a sober colouring from an eye
    That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 194-197). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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  • ''The homely beauty of the good old cause
    Is gone;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Written in London, September 1802 (l. 12-13). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''In the faith that looks through death,
    In years that bring the philosophic mind.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood (l. 185-186). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''The wealthiest man among us is the best:''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Written in London, September 1802 (l. 7). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''Stern Daughter of the Voice of God!
    O Duty! if that name thou love,
    Who art a light to guide, a rod
    To check the erring, and reprove;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode to Duty (l. 1-4), Poems in Two Volumes (1807). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''The cattle are grazing,
    Their heads never raising;
    There are forty feeding like one!''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Written in March (l. 8-10). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''No motion has she now, no force;
    She neither hears nor sees;
    Rolled round in earth's diurnal course,
    With rocks, and stones, and trees.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal, st. 2 (1800). This verse has been the subject of a literary dispute centering on Wordsworth's pantheism: is the death of the girl (Lucy) terrible because she is as inanimate as the earth's inert objects, or consoling because she is one with nature?
  • ''Flowers laugh before thee upon their beds
    And fragrance in thy footing treads;
    Thou dost preserve the stars from wrong;
    And the most ancient heavens, through thee, are fresh and strong.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Ode to Duty (l. 45-48). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''Like an army defeated
    The snow hath retreated,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Written in March (l. 11-12). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
  • ''And therefore does not stoop, nor lie in wait
    For wealth, or honors, or for worldly state;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Character of the Happy Warrior (l. 41-42). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.

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Best Poem of William Wordsworth

I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I ...

Read the full of I Wandered Lonely As A Cloud (Daffodils)

Stanzas

WITHIN our happy castle there dwelt One
Whom without blame I may not overlook;
For never sun on living creature shone
Who more devout enjoyment with us took:
Here on his hours he hung as on a book,
On his own time here would he float away,
As doth a fly upon a summer brook;
But go tomorrow, or belike today,
Seek for him,---he is fled; and whither none can say.

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