William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

William Wordsworth Quotes

  • ''Once did She hold the gorgeous East in fee;
    And was the safeguard of the West:''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic (l. 1-2). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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  • '''Twill soothe us in our sorrow
    That earth has something yet to show,
    The bonny holms of Yarrow!'''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Yarrow Unvisited (l. 62-64). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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  • ''Who is the happy Warrior? Who is he
    That every man in arms should wish to be?
    It is the generous spirit, who, when brought
    Among the tasks of real life, hath wrought
    Upon the plan that pleased his boyish thought:
    Whose high endeavors are an inward light
    That makes the path before him always bright:
    Who, with a natural instinct to discern
    What knowledge can perform, is diligent to learn;
    And in himself posses his own desire;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Character of the Happy Warrior (l. 1-9, 38). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
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  • ''And, when she took unto herself a Mate,
    She must espouse the everlasting Sea.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic (l. 7-8). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    4 person liked.
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  • ''Earth has not anything to show more fair:
    Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
    A sight so touching in its majesty:
    This city now doth, like a garment, wear
    The beauty of the morning; silent, bare,
    Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples lie
    Open unto the fields and to the sky;
    All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Composed Upon Westminster Bridge (written 1802, published 1807).
    8 person liked.
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  • ''Men are we, and must grieve when even the Shade
    Of that which once was great, is passed away.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic (l. 13-14). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    7 person liked.
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  • ''This city now doth, like a garment, wear
    The beauty of the morning; silent bare,
    Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples lie
    Open unto the fields and to the sky;
    All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge," (written 1802, published 1807).
    7 person liked.
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  • ''A multitude of causes unknown to former times are now acting with a combined force to blunt the discriminating powers of the mind, and unfitting it for all voluntary exertion to reduce it to a state of almost savage torpor.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Preface, Lyrical Ballads, 2nd edition (1801). Among the causes Wordsworth perceived were, "the great national events which are daily taking place, and the increasing accumulation of men in cities, where the uniformity of their occupations produces a craving for extraordinary incident which the rapid communication of intelligence hourly gratifies."
    6 person liked.
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  • ''Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;
    And all that mighty heart is lying still!''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Composed upon Westminster Bridge September 3, 1802 (l. 13-14). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    6 person liked.
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  • ''We poets in our youth begin in gladness;
    But thereof comes in the end despondency and madness.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. "Resolution and Independence," st. 7, Poems in Two Volumes (1807).
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Best Poem of William Wordsworth

A Night Thought

Lo! where the Moon along the sky
Sails with her happy destiny;
Oft is she hid from mortal eye
Or dimly seen,
But when the clouds asunder fly
How bright her mien!

Far different we--a froward race,
Thousands though rich in Fortune's grace
With cherished sullenness of pace
Their way pursue,
Ingrates who wear a smileless face
The whole year through.

If kindred humours e'er would make
My spirit droop for drooping's sake,
From Fancy following in thy wake,
Bright ship of heaven!
A counter impulse let me take
And be forgiven.

Read the full of A Night Thought

A Complaint

There is a change--and I am poor;
Your love hath been, nor long ago,
A fountain at my fond heart's door,
Whose only business was to flow;
And flow it did; not taking heed
Of its own bounty, or my need.

What happy moments did I count!
Blest was I then all bliss above!

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