William Wordsworth

(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

William Wordsworth Quotes

  • ''Not without hope we suffer and we mourn.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Elegiac Stanzas (l. 60). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    5 person liked.
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  • '''How is it that you live, and what is it you do?'''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Resolution and Independence (l. 119). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    5 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • ''The light that never was, on sea or land,
    The consecration, and the Poet's dream;''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Elegiac Stanzas (l. 15-16). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    6 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''Choice word and measured phrase, above the reach
    Of ordinary men; a stately speech;
    Such as grave livers do in Scotland use,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Resolution and Independence (l. 95-97). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    4 person liked.
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  • ''A deep distress hath humanized my Soul.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Elegiac Stanzas (l. 36). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    7 person liked.
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  • ''The oldest man he seemed that ever wore grey hairs.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Resolution and Independence (l. 56). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    5 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''The rapt One, of the godlike forehead,
    The heaven-eyed creature sleeps in earth:
    And Lamb, the frolic and the gentle,
    Has vanished from his lonely hearth.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg (l. 17-20). . . The Poems; Vol. 2 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1989) Penguin Books.
    2 person liked.
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  • ''I thought of Chatterton, the marvellous boy,
    The sleepless soul that perished in his pride;
    Of him who walked in glory and in joy
    Following his plough, along the mountain side:
    By our own spirits are we deified:
    We poets in our youth begin in gladness;
    But thereof come in the end despondency and madness.''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Resolution and Independence (l. 43-49). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    3 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''Our haughty life is crowned with darkness,
    Like London with its own black wreath,''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg (l. 29-30). . . The Poems; Vol. 2 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1989) Penguin Books.
    3 person liked.
    1 person did not like.
  • ''But how can he expect that others should
    Build for him, sow for him, and at his call
    Love him, who for himself will take no heed at all?''
    William Wordsworth (1770-1850), British poet. Resolution and Independence (l. 40-42). . . The Poems; Vol. 1 [William Wordsworth]. John O. Hayden, ed. (1977, repr. 1990) Penguin Books.
    5 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

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Best Poem of William Wordsworth

A Character

I marvel how Nature could ever find space
For so many strange contrasts in one human face:
There's thought and no thought, and there's paleness and bloom
And bustle and sluggishness, pleasure and gloom.

There's weakness, and strength both redundant and vain;
Such strength as, if ever affliction and pain
Could pierce through a temper that's soft to disease,
Would be rational peace--a philosopher's ease.

There's indifference, alike when he fails or succeeds,
And attention full ten times as much as there needs;
Pride where there's no envy, there's ...

Read the full of A Character

Stanzas

WITHIN our happy castle there dwelt One
Whom without blame I may not overlook;
For never sun on living creature shone
Who more devout enjoyment with us took:
Here on his hours he hung as on a book,
On his own time here would he float away,
As doth a fly upon a summer brook;
But go tomorrow, or belike today,
Seek for him,---he is fled; and whither none can say.

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