Alexander Pope

(21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744 / London / England)

Alexander Pope Poems

41. Prayer Of St. Francis Xavier 3/30/2010
42. Sandys Ghost ; A Proper Ballad On The New Ovid's Metamorphosis 3/30/2010
43. Sappho To Phaon (Ovid Heroid Xv) 3/30/2010
44. Solitude 1/13/2003
45. Solitude: An Ode 1/3/2003
46. Song, By A Person Of Quality 3/30/2010
47. Sound And Sense 1/3/2003
48. Spring - The First Pastoral ; Or Damon 3/30/2010
49. Summer 1/3/2003
50. The Basset-Table : An Eclogue 3/30/2010
51. The Challenge: A Court Ballad 3/30/2010
52. The Dunciad: Book I. 3/30/2010
53. The Dunciad: Book Ii. 3/30/2010
54. The Dunciad: Book Iv 3/30/2010
55. The Dying Christian To His Soul 1/3/2003
56. The Fable Of Dryope - Ovid's Metamorphoses Book 9, [v. 324-393] 3/30/2010
57. The Iliad: Book Vi (Excerpt) 1/1/2004
58. The Looking-Glass. : On Mrs. Pulteney 3/30/2010
59. The Messiah : A Sacred Eclogue 3/30/2010
60. The Rape Of The Lock: Canto 1 1/1/2004
61. The Rape Of The Lock: Canto 2 1/1/2004
62. The Rape Of The Lock: Canto 3 1/1/2004
63. The Rape Of The Lock: Canto 4 1/1/2004
64. The Rape Of The Lock: Canto 5 1/1/2004
65. The Riddle Of The World 1/3/2003
66. The Temple Of Fame 3/30/2010
67. The Three Gentle Shepherds 3/30/2010
68. To Lady Mary Wortley Montagu 3/30/2010
69. To Mr. Thomas Southern, On His Birth-Day 3/30/2010
70. To Mrs. M. B. On Her Birthday 3/30/2010
71. To The Author Of A Poem Entitled Succession 3/30/2010
72. Translation Of A Prayer Of Brutus 3/30/2010
73. Two Or Three: A Recipe To Make A Cuckold 1/3/2003
74. Universal Prayer 1/13/2003
75. Untitled 3/30/2010
76. Verses Left By Mr. Pope 3/30/2010
77. Vertumnus And Pomona : Ovid's Metamorphoses, Book 14 [v. 623-771] 3/30/2010
78. Weeping 3/30/2010
79. Windsor Forest 3/30/2010
80. Winter - The Fourth Pastoral, Or Daphne 3/30/2010
Best Poem of Alexander Pope

Ode On Solitude

Happy the man, whose wish and care
A few paternal acres bound,
Content to breathe his native air,
In his own ground.

Whose heards with milk, whose fields with bread,
Whose flocks supply him with attire,
Whose trees in summer yield him shade,
In winter fire.

Blest! who can unconcern'dly find
Hours, days, and years slide soft away,
In health of body, peace of mind,
Quiet by day,

Sound sleep by night; study and ease
Together mix'd; sweet ...

Read the full of Ode On Solitude

Essay On Man

The First Epistle

Awake, my ST. JOHN!(1) leave all meaner things
To low ambition, and the pride of Kings.
Let us (since Life can little more supply
Than just to look about us and to die)
Expatiate(2) free o'er all this scene of Man;
A mighty maze! but not without a plan;
A Wild, where weeds and flow'rs promiscuous shoot,

[Hata Bildir]