Edgar Lee Masters

(23 August 1868 – 5 March 1950 / Kansas / United States)

Edgar Lee Masters Poems

41. Charlie French 1/3/2003
42. Chase Henry 1/3/2003
43. Clarence Darrow 1/3/2003
44. Clarence Fawcett 1/3/2003
45. Columbus Cheney 1/3/2003
46. Conrad Siever 1/3/2003
47. Constance Hately 1/3/2003
48. Cooney Potter 1/3/2003
49. Daisy Fraser 1/3/2003
50. Daniel M'Cumber 1/3/2003
51. Davis Matlock 1/3/2003
52. Deacon Taylor 1/3/2003
53. Dillard Sissman 1/3/2003
54. Dippold The Optician 1/3/2003
55. Doc Hill 1/3/2003
56. Doctor Meyers 1/3/2003
57. Dora Williams 1/3/2003
58. Dorcas Gustine 1/3/2003
59. Dow Kritt 1/3/2003
60. Dr. Siegfried Iseman 1/3/2003
61. E.C. Culbertson 1/3/2003
62. Edith Conant 1/3/2003
63. Editor Whedon 1/3/2003
64. Edmund Pollard 1/3/2003
65. Elijah Browning 1/3/2003
66. Elizabeth Childers 1/3/2003
67. Elliott Hawkins 1/3/2003
68. Elmer Karr 1/3/2003
69. Elsa Wertman 1/3/2003
70. Emily Sparks 1/3/2003
71. English Thornton 1/3/2003
72. Enoch Dunlap 1/3/2003
73. Epilogue 1/3/2003
74. Ernest Hyde 1/3/2003
75. Eugene Carman 1/3/2003
76. Eugenia Todd 1/3/2003
77. Ezra Bartlett 1/3/2003
78. Faith Matheny 1/3/2003
79. Father Malloy 1/3/2003
80. Felix Schmidt 1/3/2003
Best Poem of Edgar Lee Masters

Silence

I have known the silence of the stars and of the sea,
And the silence of the city when it pauses,
And the silence of a man and a maid,
And the silence of the sick
When their eyes roam about the room.
And I ask: For the depths,
Of what use is language?
A beast of the field moans a few times
When death takes its young.
And we are voiceless in the presence of realities --
We cannot speak.

A curious boy asks an old soldier
Sitting in front of the grocery store,
"How did you lose your leg?"
And the old soldier is struck with silence, ...

Read the full of Silence

Peleg Poague

Horses and men are just alike.
There was my stallion, Billy Lee,
Black as a cat and trim as a deer,
With an eye of fire, keen to start,
And he could hit the fastest speed
Of any racer around Spoon River.
But just as you'd think he couldn't lose,
With his lead of fifty yards or more,
He'd rear himself and throw the rider,

[Hata Bildir]