Elizabeth Barrett Browning

(6 March 1806 – 29 June 1861 / Durham / England)

Elizabeth Barrett Browning Poems

121. Sonnet Xliii 12/31/2002
122. Sonnet Xliv 12/31/2002
123. Sonnet Xliv: Belovèd, Thou Hast Brought Me 1/3/2003
124. Sonnet Xv 12/31/2002
125. Sonnet Xv: Accuse Me Not 1/3/2003
126. Sonnet Xvi 12/31/2002
127. Sonnet Xvi: And Yet, Because Thou 1/3/2003
128. Sonnet Xvii 12/31/2002
129. Sonnet Xvii: My Poet, Thou Canst Touch 1/3/2003
130. Sonnet Xviii: I Never Gave A Lock Of Hair 1/3/2003
131. Sonnet Xx 12/31/2002
132. Sonnet Xx: Belovèd, My Belovèd 1/3/2003
133. Sonnet Xxi 12/31/2002
134. Sonnet Xxi: Say Over Again 1/3/2003
135. Sonnet Xxii 12/31/2002
136. Sonnet Xxii: When Our Two Souls Stand Up 1/3/2003
137. Sonnet Xxiii 12/31/2002
138. Sonnet Xxiii: Is It Indeed So? 1/3/2003
139. Sonnet Xxiv 12/31/2002
140. Sonnet Xxiv: Let The World's Sharpness 1/3/2003
141. Sonnet Xxix 12/31/2002
142. Sonnet Xxix: I Think Of Thee 1/3/2003
143. Sonnet Xxv 12/31/2002
144. Sonnet Xxv: A Heavy Heart, Belovèd 1/3/2003
145. Sonnet Xxvi 12/31/2002
146. Sonnet Xxvi: I Lived With Visions 1/3/2003
147. Sonnet Xxvii 12/31/2002
148. Sonnet Xxvii: My Dear Belovèd 1/3/2003
149. Sonnet Xxviii: My Letters 5/13/2001
150. Sonnet Xxx 12/31/2002
151. Sonnet Xxx: I See Thine Image 1/3/2003
152. Sonnet Xxxi 12/31/2002
153. Sonnet Xxxi: Thou Comest! 1/3/2003
154. Sonnet Xxxii 12/31/2002
155. Sonnet Xxxii: The First Time 1/3/2003
156. Sonnet Xxxiii 12/31/2002
157. Sonnet Xxxiii: Yes, Call Me By My Pet-Name! 1/3/2003
158. Sonnet Xxxiv 12/31/2002
159. Sonnet Xxxiv: With The Same Heart 1/3/2003
160. Sonnet Xxxix 12/31/2002
Best Poem of Elizabeth Barrett Browning

How Do I Love Thee?

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of every day's
Most quiet need, by sun and candlelight.
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love with a passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints, -- I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my ...

Read the full of How Do I Love Thee?

Sonnet Xxi

Say over again, and yet once over again,
That thou dost love me. Though the word repeated
Should seem ' a cuckoo-song,' as thou dost treat it,
Remember, never to the hill or plain,
Valley and wood, without her cuckoo-strain
Comes the fresh Spring in all her green completed.
Beloved, I, amid the darkness greeted
By a doubtful spirit-voice, in that doubt's pain
Cry, ' Speak once more--thou lovest ! ' Who can fear

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