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Writing Poetry


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  • Keith Sifelani (6/10/2014 3:20:00 AM) Post reply

    First of all i think its something that needs to come deep down your heart
    not something you sit down and just write like school home /work.

  • Kevin Patrick (6/7/2014 2:05:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    This is one of my first stabs at an English sonnet, although I did cheat, with the constructs of rhythm, I still have a lot of work


    Blind is the ocean to the sound of its motion
    As it roars with momentum of immeasurable melody
    Cascading in whitecaps of sinuous elocution
    Against the gold Shorelines with foam balm fidelity
    And Astounded, I smile as my toes snicker gusto
    Flowing in the convent bonds of primeval sapphire
    That Drips like champagne into my pours and soaked muscles
    Lashing emulsified brine into Salt licking pyres
    Enraptured and serene, my vision twists of blue
    Grazing the vanishing points that single heaven and earth
    Are just the marginal lines of material sinew
    That draws reciprocity from once spiritual hearth
    And the sky sits clear, deaf to these great sights
    As I stand gazing awestruck to this arena of Delight

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  • Catherine Rodgers (6/2/2014 2:27:00 PM) Post reply

    My love is sweet
    My love is so sweet
    When you kiss me
    my love is so nice
    that you huge me
    my love is so sweat
    that you love me
    forever....
    I love you that you want for get me or you...
    My love is so sweet taste like honey
    when you ask me to married u i know we up and down then
    I said my love is so sweet

  • Gulsher John (6/1/2014 1:18:00 PM) Post reply

    An old man's saga

    PRESENT

    At dusk
    when twilight falls
    and dyes the sky
    with stygian view, and turns
    the blue and white into
    an Orange hue;
    till the darkness declares,
    the night's feasts and fears.
    (surely a teasing play of Nature,
    where all feelings and fears of man
    are figured like in the theatre)

    PAST

    'This often travels me back- in time
    we used to sit or thrashing around
    (in such state of frenzy)
    sweetly we hymned
    some loving rhymes.
    (like a tickling breeze thats flirting with your reddened cheeks)
    But don't know how and when,
    we got our hearts cracked and coiled;
    and had masked our smiles.
    (who cut that string and
    let our passion spoiled)

    END

    Now that
    all those revelries had gone
    that proved both in the wrong,
    (in these yawning hours,
    sitting by the fire alone
    and staring at the dying embers)
    i find myself, only talk to myself,
    and i wish
    to resurrect the past
    and wed again (my heart insane)
    to those 'listless' sights and strains'...
    (what else an old man can do
    on such cold, misty eve.)

  • Anand Brown (5/28/2014 7:57:00 AM) Post reply

    Improving your poetry writing skills is a skill that needs constant practicing. Reading a lot of poetry will help you gain content on themes and extracts you might want to use in your work.

    Remember, we all have something to say. We are all poets!

  • Aimee Woolford (5/27/2014 1:35:00 PM) Post reply

    Hi guys!
    I might be young but i love to write poems.
    PLEASE FRIEND REQUEST ME
    I have many poems to share with all of you
    1. Think of rhyming words that go with your theme
    2. Start in pencil, that way you can rub out any mistakes.
    3. Just go with the flow / whatever your brain tells you
    4. FINISH!

  • Gulsher John (5/24/2014 6:27:00 AM) Post reply

    Quick Guide to Prosody

    Think of the major technical components of poetry as roughly equivalent to the way music is represented on the page, turning
    something you hear into something you can see.

    I. RHYME involves matching sounds of words. As melody is to music, so is RHYME to poetry. The sounds of vowels are
    what create most rhymes. Because you can hear the words that match they have sounds that are (somewhat) analagous to
    different notes (do, re, mi etc.) .
    To scan a poem for ryhme, you assign a single alphabetical letter, starting with a to the sound of the last word in the line.
    Whatever the first sound or end rhyme is, mark it " A." If the next word has the same vowel sound (tree, sea or tree, see) , mark
    the next line " A." IF the next line has a different vowel sound, mark it " B." Lines with the same end vowel sound, the same
    rhyme, get the same letter.

    Example: The first four lines of Byron's " She Walks in Beauty" :

    She walks in beauty like the night a
    Of cloudless climes and starry skies b
    And all that's best of dark and bright a
    Meet in her aspect and her eyes. b

    In this case a and b are both exact rhymes. Any pattern of lines that alternate in this way form an example of alternate rhyme.
    When any line rhymes with the very next line, that is called a couplet. If three lines in a row rhyme, that's a triplet.

    II. METER
    If rhyme is like melody, meter is the aspect of time, involving rhythm and accents of poetry. Whereas musicians represent time
    and beat with a time signature, like 4/4,3/4, or 6/8, readers of poetry record the beat of poetic words by dividing them into
    kinds of FEET based on lengths of syllables, and locations of spoken accents.

    Here are the major kinds of POETIC FEET:
    A foot can match one single word, or it can span several words.

    iamb any two syllables, usually a single word but not always, whose accent is on the second syllable.
    Example = upon, arise

    trochee any two syllables, usually a single word but not always, word whose accent is on the first syllable.
    Example = virtue, further

    anapest any three syllables, usually a single word but not always, word whose accent is on the third syllable.
    Example = intervene

    dactyl any three syllables, usually a single word but not always, word whose accent is on the first syllable.
    Example = tenderly

    spondee any two syllables, sometimes a single word but not always, with strong accent on the first and second syllable.
    Example (in this case no one word, but a series of words in this line:
    The long day wanes, the slow moon climbs. The words " day wanes" form a spondee.
    pyrrhic any two syllables, often across words, with each syllable unstressed/unaccented

    To name the kind of foot, use the adjective form of these words.
    A line of iambs = iambic
    A line of trochees = trochaic
    A line of anapests = anapestic
    a line of dactyls = dactylic
    a line of spondees = spondaic

    The number of feet in a given line is maked as a form of the word meter.
    dimeter - a 2-foot line
    trimeter a 3-foot line
    tetrameter a 4-foot line
    pentameter a 5-foot line
    hexameter a 6-foot line

    III. Names of Groups of lines
    Any group of lines forming a unit is a stanza.
    Stanza of 3 lines is a tercet
    Stanza of 4 lines is a quatrain
    Stanza of 6 lines is a sestet
    Stanza of 7 lines is a septet
    Stanza of 8 lines is an octave


    IV. How to Scan a poem.
    Mark the rhyme, with single alphabets (eg. abab) and the meter by counting the number of feet, and the kind of feet in the line.
    Not all lines contain only one kind of foot. For example, quite often the first foot of an iambic line is reversed, making it a
    trochee. When this happens in a poetic line it is called a " trochaic inversion." As you'll see these poetic laws are meant to be
    interpreted, and they are often bent.

    Iamb = Ú / (second syllable gets the accent)
    Ú / Ú / Ú / Ú /
    My love is of a birth as rare a number of feet = 4 iambs
    Ú / Ú / Ú / Ú /
    As 'tis, for object, strange and high; b number of feet = 4 iambs
    Ú / Ú / Ú / Ú /
    It was begotten by Despair a number of feet = 4 iambs
    Ú / Ú / Ú /Ú /
    Upon Impossibility. b number of feet = 4 iambs

    Remarks: the first stanza of Marvell's poem is therefore in iambic tetrameter. The basic foot is the iamb, and there are four of
    them in each line. Note how the first line shows iamb can be split across two words, and in line 4 how multiple iambs can occur within one word.

  • Brian Johnston (5/24/2014 6:07:00 AM) Post reply

    Advice To Young Poets (Rev 1)

    It never is an easy ride
    And I don’t mean to deride,
    But your imaginative sense,
    Far exceeds experience.

    Of course you must learn how to fight,
    Gird your pen for unmanned flight,
    By never making yourself wrong,
    Though your youth sullies the song.

    Youth’s insights are sometimes shallow,
    Tend fields that should stay fallow,
    But plant your grain and pray for rain,
    Do not exaggerate pain.

    Remaining true to you today,
    Welcome muse, chips fall as may,
    Though muse may always be your guide,
    The color’s yours to decide.

    A skeleton the muse gives you!
    Living poems come to view,
    With flesh, with heart poet donates,
    No life served on silver plates.

    A clever title serves your need,
    (And reluctant muse can feed)
    Often gets the juices flowing
    When no sure path is showing.

    A dream can sometimes give release
    To deep feelings seeking peace,
    When you're at war with what you know,
    Offer insight where to go.

    Try to stay close to what you love,
    Don’t waste time on what’s above.
    Know it’s just you that you’re selling,
    Make peace with fears you’re quelling.

    And no, not once forgo the chance
    With living poems to dance
    With humble, breathless savoir-faire,
    Please escort her from her chair.

    Brian Johnston
    May 4 2014

    Please visit the Poet's Notes section of many of my poems for even more comments
    on how I approach writing poetry.

    _____________________________

    Poet's Mouth

    I feel sure mine’s a true case of ‘Poet’s Mouth’
    My fans certainly are precocious,
    My goodness, oh they think I’m divine
    They are all itching to be my Valentine.

    I feel sure mine’s a true case of ‘Poet’s Mouth’
    My words like rare jewels are so precious,
    My rhythms like wild bats fly so free
    Folk’s hearts skip a beat when they listen to me.

    I feel sure mine’s a true case of ‘Poet’s Mouth’
    My thoughts like fresh snow truly pristine,
    My rhymes like holy water quite pure
    This confluence shining because I’m demure.

    I feel sure mine’s a true case of ‘Poet’s Mouth’
    My insights are really infectious,
    My verse filled with poetic debris,
    If I wrote free verse they could weaponize me.

    I feel sure mine’s a true case of ‘Poet’s Mouth’
    For high honor I’m certainly fit…..
    How perfect if the first could be me….
    Winner of the Golden Globes (of poetry!)

    Brian Johnston
    March 23,2014

    Please visit the Poet's Notes section of many of my poems for even more comments
    on how I approach writing poetry.

    ___________________________________


    Impossibly High Standards (Revised)

    Just to be present is a blessed event,
    Arguments about form are just chatter,
    The hour it arrives always filled with portent,
    No competing high purpose will matter.

    For writing a poem’s like creating life,
    An honor to just assist in its birth,
    To battle with muse, fight with clarity’s knife,
    What could there be more important on earth?

    The paper we write on is like Holy Ground,
    Our ink honors life, its fragrance like myrrh,
    To grind mental gears is a world shaking sound,
    Images form, suggest God’s passing blur.

    As rainbows crown rain that brings life to the plain,
    So does new poetry honor its source,
    Heals the soul, mends the heart, abolishes pain,
    Moves emotion along God’s refined course.

    Poems that all of our emptiness purges,
    Poems like river banks guide our essence,
    Until, at long last, humanity merges
    With the vast sea of God's exuberance.

    Brian Johnston
    April 30,2014

    Please visit the Poet's Notes section of many of my poems for even more comments
    on how I approach writing poetry.


    _____________________________________

    An Appeal To (As Yet) Undiscovered Poets

    Undiscovered poets hear me, to PH draw near,
    This just might be a good chance for your views to ring clear.

    An email address you need to get up and running,
    Huge monkeys it‘s said could really write something stunning.

    So grab paper and pen, come as soon as you canna,
    But don’t forget please sir to bring several banana.

    Enough monkey typewriters might just supplant Shakespeare,
    Given enough time (and assuming plenty of beer.)

    We don’t have all day but trust me. I have a good hunch,
    With banana enough friend we don't think about lunch.

    So let’s all hop to it just see man what we can do,
    If monkey shenanigans truly carry us though.

    Show literary typos the ace in our pocket,
    By lighting the fuse to our post(English) grad rocket.

    Brian Johnston
    May 7,2014


    This Poem requires its own special vocabulary explanation (see below)
    Brian’s bastardized Jamaican English explained….
    ...'PH' - PoemHunter (you know man, the site you be on right now)
    …‘Huge’ – a synonym for ‘a great many’ or ‘a large number of’….
    …’canna’ – a synonym for ‘are able to, ’ or slang for ‘smoke a joint, ’ dare I say it
    .................'cannabis! ' (Serendipitous luck I assure you. I'm not that smart.)
    …’banana’ - the plural form of banana. Hey it's my poem!
    …’supplant’ - a synonym for ‘prove to be better than’ as in ‘my pot’s better than
    .......................your pot’….
    ….’beer’ – an alcoholic beverage you always think you can drink more of….
    …’shenanigans’ – an Irish?word that means ‘horse play’ or ‘sculduggery’….
    …’typos’ – a new hip word comparing Poetry snobs to a misspelled word….
    …’ace in the pocket’ – a way to cheat when playing the card game Poker….
    …’post(English) grad rocket’ - a new poetry craze that English majors can’t crack! ....

    Visit my site for even more comments on writing particular poems and discussion
    of what makes a good poem good. In particular I recommend several letters
    between one of the top poets on the site Tapan Pradman and myself posted under the title of
    'Open Letter #A: To All PoemHunter Poets.' I hope to offer more of these letters in the future.

    But truly the real gifts of this site are the new friends you are sure to find. You may make
    enemies too (in spite of good intentions.) Save the grain, let the chaff blow away in the wind.
    If you have heart and talent you won't need the angry ones who have an axe to grind in any case.

  • N P. (5/20/2014 1:11:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    Hi I am a beginner looking for people to critique my work and give me feedback/advice.

    http://www.poemhunter.com/nicholas-paradis/poems/

    -Nick

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  • Parmanand Potdukhe (5/19/2014 4:58:00 AM) Post reply

    Accept, dear girl, this little token,
    And if between the lines you seek,
    You'll find the love I've often spoken—
    The love my dying lips shall speak.

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