Post more comments
Want a gift card for being active Forum member? Post comments and win $25 gift card every week.
Rules:
PoemHunter.com will be giving away Amazon.com gift cards (worth $75 in total) every week to first three members ($25 each) who participate most in our forum discussions. You just have to post comments on forum pages, poet pages or poem pages anywhere inside PoemHunter.com
Comments posted needs to be in different pages. Posting more than 1 comment on the same page will only be counted once.
Members can not post comments without being logged in.
PoemHunter.com has the right to cancel or edit this contest.
PoemHunter.com has a right to disqualify or ban member(s) without providing any type of reason, belief or proof in regards to any type of illegal activity or fraud.

Looking For A Poem


Can't find a poem you've heard once? Ask other visitors for help. Also share explanations and summaries of poems.
Post a message

Click here to list all messages

Margaret Haig Margaret Haig Female, 60, Australia (10/30/2012 5:43:00 AM)

I would like someone to explain what haiku and free potrey is and what type is called when 2lines rhyme, then the next 2 lines rhyme, and also where every 2nd line rhymes and every 1and 3rd line rhyme lines. I'm looking for a poem that not sure of the writer, but it was something like the words my mother told me, about a child beng told in the early 30s. Things a child needed to know. And I would love to write children's short stories,
Where it's animals telling stories, or the little dog private detective. Which I wrote 4yrs ago. And was wondering if any free competitions for writers.
Meg(Margaret Haig)

To post a reply to this message, click here
Replies for this message:

 

  • Laura Burns (10/30/2012 11:09:00 AM) Post reply

    Haiku is a 17-syllable poem, in three lines, usually containing a nature reference. Free verse does not contain rhyme (in English) , except sometimes sporadically, nor have a consistent meter. The rhyme schemes you refer to are called an aa-bb rhyme scheme and an ab-ab rhyme scheme, respectively.

[Hata Bildir]