Poetics and Poetry Discussion


Post a message
  • Rookie Marcy Jarvis (11/2/2005 2:50:00 PM) Post reply
    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.

    Yeah, I'm not letting you off the tenterhooks so fast. I really, really want to know why it bothers people so much that they would prefer a separate list. Most poets are not appreciated in their own lifetimes and I have no doubt whatsoever that Homer would have gotten a big kickout of being alongside a few of us gals. ; -D

  • Rookie Marcy Jarvis (11/2/2005 2:36:00 PM) Post reply

    Andrew,

    why on earth would you be worried that people might get a kick out of their placement or that it might inspire them to see an old name they never read and bother to take a look? I don't see anything here about people 'who keep checking' - I saw that Max mentioned it and a few of us looked. And, (gasp!) one of us said thank you and one of us made a joke.

  • Rookie Mary Nagy (11/2/2005 1:25:00 PM) Post reply | Read 5 replies

    Marcy,
    Ya know what's funny? I was eating Kentucky Fried CHicken yesterday and the thought of something you said wouldn't leave my head.......Back awhile ago you mentioned that something reminded you of eating chicken...how you get down to the bone and suck the marrow right out of it while you try to get all the little scraps of 'stuff' off the bone. It kinda ruined my chicken for me but it made me laugh that you were on my mind while I was trying to eat my chicken! (I just thought you may appreciate this) :) Sincerely, Mary

    Replies for this message:
  • Rookie Marcy Jarvis (11/2/2005 12:17:00 PM) Post reply | Read 5 replies

    It's some kind of brain washing thing, right? Like they pair you up with your doppelganger from history, right? Like Max is next to Tristan Tzara (LOL) and I'm sandwiched between H.D. and Wendell Berry.

    Replies for this message:
  • Rookie - 7 Points Max Reif (11/2/2005 11:15:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    For your info: some of 'us' are among the most popular poets in history (the '500 Most Popular Poets' list) . Mary Nagy, for example (as I notified her last night) is #280, while *Homer* clocks in at 285! Lamont is somewhere in the 300s I think. A lot of the Forum crowd is there. Oh, and that great poet, 'Anonymous' is at 248, I think. Or is it 348? The most popular of 'us' I could find was...HERBERT, at 176!

    Replies for this message:
    • Rookie - 7 Points Michael Shepherd (11/3/2005 4:29:00 AM) Post reply

      Credit where credit's due, Max: our three Aussies, Jerry, Herbert, and Allan, are way ahead in the honours list: Jerry's been up there in the 70s for a long time, and rightly so. Hours before you and ... more

  • Rookie Nescher Pyscher (11/2/2005 9:38:00 AM) Post reply | Read 3 replies

    I'm just popping my head in to say hello.

    : : Waves: :

    'Hello.'

    Replies for this message:
  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (11/2/2005 9:28:00 AM) Post reply | Read 2 replies

    I clicked on a 'News Headline'on the home page today to read the Ted Kooser item (to taunt Lamont with, was the second reason...) . I've complained before about the media who don't let you read the news item without subscribing to the online Yukon Mercury or Kerala Times (which is pretty with-it though) .
    In this case the Manhattan Messenger, for God's sake, didn't even ask me to subscribe - it just told me I was not authorised to read it. If anyone else is fuming as I am (and if they pay PH for this slot, then PH is defrauding them...) , would they moan to PH mgt, as I have?

    Replies for this message:
  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (11/2/2005 6:50:00 AM) Post reply | Read 2 replies

    I'm tempted in my cynical way, to comment on the Winters Wonderland: tonight we go to the Met to be transported by that aria about art and love sung by Tosca, victimised by political circumstances (...) . Tomorrow we need a plumber, quick as shit. He charges a friggin' fortune for his services. Next week he takes his Significant Udder to the Met on the proceeds -yes, even he has the Highlights DVD; we stay home and forget that next planned visit to the Met...

    Replies for this message:
    • Rookie Max Reif (11/2/2005 11:19:00 AM) Post reply

      I just read that Winters poem. I rather liked the contrasting atmospheres. I can see the Marxist (thought you wrote Max at first, then saw it was Marx) influence, but I don't feel it intrudes. The pro ... more

    • Rookie Poetry Hound (11/2/2005 7:06:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

      Shep, you are the king of wit around here. I think this comment of yours just begs for a poem by you.

  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (11/2/2005 6:38:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    OK kids, did I hear the bell for the end of playground break? Back to our study of Anne Winters' poem..you can google it read by the poet, or another if you subscribe to the NY Times and Real player... and google the article on Slate about her under her name, which is a good way in to her world.

    She's a great describer, mostly of the Manhattan scene. But she's also twinning this with an old-guard Marxist agenda, so she sets up this poem as Undeserved Wealth flaunting its furs and jewels (aw c'mon Annie, have you smelt the working class in the cheaper Met seats?) supported by the toiling working class down there in the schist (!) .
    So there's a point in the poem where a Shakespeare or a Tolstoy would have raised the view of humanity, where Marx kicks in.

    However well worth reading she is, and dare I say, better than some of the kids working their way through cliche to poetry on this site, or should I say, the scum who deserve to be fluoridated outasite?

    Replies for this message:
  • Rookie - 150 Points Poetry Hound (11/2/2005 5:58:00 AM) Post reply | Read 6 replies

    Thanks for your concern. Just wanted to clear that up.

    Replies for this message:
[Hata Bildir]